Husky Energy to sell Prince George Refinery To Tidewater for $161m

first_img Image: The Prince George Refinery is located in Prince George City, British Columbia, Canada. Photo: Courtesy of Frauke Feind from Pixabay. Canadian integrated energy company Husky Energy has signed an agreement with Tidewater Midstream and Infrastructure to sell its Prince George Refinery for a total of C$275m ($161.5m).The Prince George Refinery is located in Prince George City, British Columbia, Canada, and is capable of processing 12,000 barrels of light oil into low-sulphur gasoline and ultra-low sulphur diesel per day, and processes other products.Under the transaction agreement, Husky Energy would receive $215m in cash, along with a closing adjustment and a contingent payment of up to $60m within two years.In addition, Husky would sign a five-year offtake agreement with Tidewater for refined products from the Prince George Refinery.Husky Energy CEO Rob Peabody said: “The plan is aimed at further enhancing the resiliency of the Company “We continue to deliver on Husky’s five-year plan outlined at our Investor Day in May, with an ongoing focus on capital discipline, consistent execution and increased margins.”Husky to focus on Integrated Corridor and Offshore businessesHusky said that the decision to sell the Prince George Refinery is based on its plans to expand the Integrated Corridor and Offshore businesses.Integrated Corridor is a series of physically-linked assets including upstream thermal crude production, storage, committed pipeline capacity and refineries, designed to maximize margin capture, access to markets and optionality.In January, the company revealed its plans to carry out a strategic review and also to possibly sell its retail and commercial fuels business in Canada along with the Prince George Refinery.The Prince George Refinery is a light oil refinery that receives feed stock delivered through a pipeline from production wells in north-eastern British Columbia, Canada.The transaction is expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2019, and is subject to the receipt of regulatory approvals. Tidewater is expected to retain all the refinery staff.For the transaction, TD Securities served as financial advisor for Husky, and Torys served as legal advisor. Husky Energy intends to use the proceeds of the sale according to its funding priorities, which includes maintaining the balance sheet and returning value to shareholderslast_img read more

Audubon secures contract for King’s Quay FPS project in Gulf of Mexico

first_img Image: Audubon has secured a contract for Murphy Exploration’s King’s Quay project in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: courtesy of C Morrison/Pixabay. Audubon Companies has secured a contract for Murphy Exploration’s King’s Quay floating production system (FPS) project in the Gulf of Mexico.Under the terms of the agreement, Audubon will provide detailed engineering and design services and procurement and construction support for the project.According to the company, the scope of the project includes engineering and design of the entire King’s Quay FPS topsides with complete oil, water and gas processing trains.It also includes the design of the topsides interfaces to the hull, lifesaving equipment, marine and utility systems, accommodations, crane foundations, and other appurtenances.Details of King’s Quay FPS ProjectAudubon stated that the King’s Quay deepwater semi-submersible FPS closely replicates the Delta House FPS, currently owned and operated by Murphy in the Gulf of Mexico. The King’s Quay will feature a two-level topsides deck with a 10,000-ton payload, Utilising a similar design to the Delta House FPS.According to the company, the facility will have a nominal production capacity of 80,000 BOPD, with a peak capacity of 100,000 BOPD. The firm noted that the gas capacity will be 100 MMscf/d, with expansion capabilities to 240 MMscf/d of gas.Final installation of the platform, which will be designed to withstand wind and waves from a 1,000-year storm, will be in the Green Canyon GOM area.The company added that it expects first oil in 2022.Audubon Companies stated: “Continuing with the same innovative design approach used during the development of the Delta House FPS, Audubon Companies will apply its engineering expertise to incorporate design flexibility into all processing equipment for the King’s Quay FPS to achieve an optimal design for handling a broad range of reservoir characteristics.”In August, US-based petroleum and natural gas exploration company Murphy Oil had approved three additional projects in the Gulf of Mexico.The first of the approved projects was the King’s Quay FPS facility.The company also approved the Khaleesi/Mormont field development, with seven subsea wells, of which four were previously drilled, and infrastructure tie-back to King’s Quay FPS. US-based EPCM services provider Audubon will provide detailed engineering and design services and procurement and construction support for the projectlast_img read more

HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles

first_img View post tag: News by topic HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles View post tag: Seychelles View post tag: Anchor View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defense Share this article View post tag: Defencecenter_img A port visit to the Seychelles provided a much-needed opportunity for the crew of HMAS Newcastle to re-energise ahead of her next high-tempo counter-terrorism patrol on Operation SLIPPER.Soon after coming alongside Port Victoria, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Guided Missile Frigate (FFG) took on around one tonne of mail and care packages from loved ones in Australia, much to the delight of her crew.“It was like Christmas, parcels and letters were going out to people all through the ship. Some people had recently celebrated birthdays, so they got some nice surprises,” Acting Sub Lieutenant (ASLT) Rachel Jones, the ship’s Assistant Supply Officer, said.“Mail is always a massive morale booster on operations. It’s nice to know the people at home are thinking about us.”Stores, water and fuel were received onboard to ready Newcastle for her next patrol and were delivered by the team from the RAN Liaison Office (RANLO), who travelled to the Seychelles from Bahrain to coordinate the port visit.Newcastle also hosted an historic event: the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on the Conditions of the Transfer of Suspected Pirates, Armed Robbers and Seized Property to the Seychelles.The MOU was signed by Australian High Commissioner to the Seychelles, Her Excellency Ms Sandra Vegting, and Seychelles Minister for Home Affairs and Transport, Mr Joel Morgan.While alongside, the crew also had an opportunity to explore Mahe Island, the tropical main island of the 115 that make up the Seychelles.Some jumped at the chance to dive and snorkel in the aqua blue waters surrounding the atoll, while others recharged their batteries by meandering through local gift shops, and sampling the local cuisine.Half way through the port visit, Newcastle left the wharf and went to anchor nearby. Her crew used local water taxis for one more run ashore before farewelling the tropical paradise and returning their full attention to the mission of countering terrorism, piracy and narcotics in the Indian Ocean.Operation SLIPPER is the Australian Defence Force (ADF) contribution to the international campaign against terrorism, counter smuggling and counter piracy in the Gulf of Aden, and enhancing regional maritime security and engagement.Newcastle’s current deployment is the 55th rotation of an Australian warship to the MEAO since 1990, and her visit to the Seychelles was the fourth by a RAN vessel since 2012.[mappress]Press Release, July 5, 2013; Image: Australian Navy View post tag: Newcastle July 5, 2013 View post tag: drops Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles Training & Education View post tag: HMASlast_img read more

Art History – Adjunct

first_imgState and Federal law permit California Baptist University todiscriminate on the basis of religion in order to fulfill itspurpose. The University does not discriminate contrary to eitherState or Federal law. Position TitleArt History – Adjunct Quick Link to Postinghttps://jobs.calbaptist.edu/postings/6197 The College of Architecture, Visual Art, and Design ( CAVAD ) atCalifornia Baptist University invites applications for adjunctfaculty positions in the Fine Art/Art History Program. Review ofapplications is conducted in an ongoing manner according toneed. Qualifications Nondiscrimination Statement Position Summary Teaching responsibilities in the undergraduate Art History (FineArt) program. Specific course assignments will be dependent uponapplicant qualifications. If no, please explain (required):(Open Ended Question)* Are you both familiar with and not in conflict with thefundamental doctrines and practices of the California SouthernBaptist Convention as stated in the Baptist Faith and Message datedJune 14, 2000? (Please see above link for more information)Yes (I am familiar and not in conflict)No (I am in conflict or not familiar)center_img Posting Details A terminal degree in the field, or closely related discipline, ispreferred. Candidates working toward a terminal degree, or who havesignificant experience in the field, may be considered. Candidatesmust embrace the mission of California Baptist University, andevidence a clear understanding of, and commitment to, excellence inteaching through the integration of Christian faith. Successfulcandidates will have a history of quality University teachingexperience and demonstrated relational skills. * Are you a Christian?YesNo * Do you attend church regularly?YesNo Teaching Responsibilities Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsChristian Experience EssayCover LetterCurriculum VitaeOptional DocumentsLetter of Reference 1Letter of Reference 2Unofficial Transcriptlast_img read more

Millionaire Bodleian thief brought to book

first_imgDetective Chief Inspector Dave Cobb of the Metropolitan Police Service explained the difficulty of uncovering Hakimzadeh’s crimes.He said, “it is extremely difficult to detect the absence of these pages as Hakimzadeh took care to select material that only an expert would be able to identify, as early printed books are unique.”Library staff used electronic records to determine who had taken out the Thomas Herbert book and then examined other works these people had used.They found that related works, covering European engagement with the area from Bangladesh to modern-day Syria, were also damaged.Staff uncovered a consistent pattern of damage in works used by Hakimzadeh. By tracing the books he had used in his years as a library member, they discovered that 150 of the 842 books he had used in the library had pages missing.The British Library alerted staff at the Bodleian Library and contacted the Metropolitan Police.Police searched Hakimzadeh’s home in Kensington, London, last year and found ten examples of theft from the British Library and four from the Bodleian. Police also recovered two complete books Hakimmzadeh had stolen from Oxford’s Eastern Art library.He had inserted some of the missing pages, maps and pictures into less valuable editions of the same books he owned.Hakimzadeh originally claimed he had bought the books from second-hand market stalls. However, a British Library official was able to identify the missing pages when brought in with the police’s second visit.Experts have suggested that he stole pages to increase the value of his own collection or to add pages and illustrations to specially requested hand-made books. Hakimzadeh was the chief executive of the Iran Heritage Foundation, a charity he formed in 1995 to promote the history, languages and culture of Iran, and respected author and scholar.The vandalised books from the Bodleian and other OULS libraries related to Western engagement with the near and Middle East. Ovenden thanked all the OULS staff for their “diligence and hard work” in helping the police to solve the case and stressed the gravity of Hakimzadeh’s actions. “The seriousness with which the Metropolitan Police and both libraries have taken this case shows that theft and vandalism of this kind will not be tolerated, and will be pursued through the law to their conclusion.”Hakimzadeh is due to be sentenced in January. Meanwhile the British Library are pursuing a civil claim against Hakimzadeh, seeking to either recover the pages taken from another 150 books, or compensation.Ovendon stated that the Bodleian is also seeking ways of recovering some of the lost resources. He said, “the University is considering other action to ensure that the losses incurred by the Library are recovered.” An Iranian millionaire who stole from “priceless” collections in the Bodleian and British Library may face jail after causing an estimated £1 million worth of damage.Farhard Hakimzadeh, a respected businessman, publisher and intellectual, cut pages from 150 books using a scalpel or razor and then inserted them into his own copies.Bodleian staff have condemned Hakimzadeh’s actions as cultural vandalism and described his behaviour as “exceedingly clever, devious and skilful.”He pleaded guilty to fourteen charges of stealing maps, pages and illustrations, and faces a further twenty charges in connection with the thefts.Hakimzadeh had taken pages from 47 volumes from the Bodleian since 2003 alone, a spokesman for the Bodleian claimed. Stolen maps include one from the British Library worth £32,000.Richard Ovenden, the Bodleian’s Keeper of Special Collections, said, “his actions fall into the category of cultural vandalism, where his own desire to own rare books encouraged him to damage highly important research materials, and significant cultural objects, that were acquired by the Bodleian and other OULS libraries over many hundreds of years for the benefit of scholars in Oxford and for the many visiting researchers who come to the University because of its libraries.”Ovenden emphasised that the damage Hakimzadeh has done to irreplaceable works is irrevocable, with effects that will be felt by future researchers who will not have access to full sources.He said, “most of these books suffered the deliberate removal of pages, and the damage caused will be permanent. The cost of the damage he caused to future scholarship in these fields is therefore significant.”Hakimzadeh’s crimes were finally exposed when a researcher in the British Library realised that a page from a 17th century book by Sir Thomas Herbert was missing.last_img read more

Keble reverses ball accommodation decision following student pressure

first_imgThe organisational committee is split into a student section and a college working party, the latter of which was initially responsible for the decision to refuse onsite accommodation to students “for various logistical and safety reasons,” according to Edwin Peel, the chair of the working party. Initial concerns revolved around the cost of rooms outside college, the cheapest of which was priced at £50 – thus making it difficult for low-income students to attend. As the majority of the accommodation was located at Oxford Brookes, students also expressed worry that drunk students might be forced to walk to the site alone in a vulnerable state. She added that future balls outside term time should include an access officer, due to fears that “with such a quick turnover of students, it can be quite difficult to create long-lasting change, as when students leave, the accountability does so with them and instead we go back to square one with the new cohort.” Despite the success of student action, Al-Qaryooti expressed she was “disappointed that it took such pressure from the student body to actually make accessibility provisions and that such concerns from the student part of the committee were ignored when these decisions were initially made.” Rooms in college were originally priced at £43, but the ball committee has decided to subsidise the cost, reducing the price to £33. They will be allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis, although full bursary students will have their rooms automatically reserved. In an email to college members, ball executive Sam Edwards said 200 rooms would be initially made available on November 7, but that this was “the maximum number which can be confirmed at this stage,” as the college is yet to finalise academic requirements for students staying on for work in 9th week. center_img The college has also committed to offering heavily subsidised tickets to Moritz-Heyman scholars, meaning that they will be able to attend the ball at a cost of £50, which Al-Qaryooti lauded as an “extraordinary commitment to accessibility from Keble and should be followed by other ball committees.” Third-year student Hannah Al-Qaryooti, who was instrumental in proposing the motion and highlighting the accessibility concerns involved, said, “I am extremely happy that Keble have reversed their decision. It shows that they have listened to student concerns about accessibility.” Social Backgrounds Rep Adam Ferguson told Cherwell: “It is very encouraging to see that Keble is both aware of, and open to our suggestions as to how best support low-income students. Given a short amount of time and a tight schedule, the college acted remarkably quickly and have introduced an element of accessibility to the ball which will hopefully remain indefinitely into the future.” Keble College has reversed its decision to refuse students onsite accommodation during the commemoration ball on June 27, 2020. The move comes after students put substantial pressure on the organisational committee to secure rooms in college, citing access and welfare concerns which would particularly affect low-income students.last_img read more

Air Quality Forecast For Vanderburgh County

first_imgFridayJune 23SaturdayJune 24SundayJune 25MondayJune 26TuesdayJune 27 Ozone(peak 8-hr avg)(expected)NA*NA*NA*NA*NA* Air quality forecasts for Evansville and Vanderburgh County are provided as a public service. They are best estimates of predicted pollution levels that can be used as a guide so people can modify their activities and reduce their exposure to air quality conditions that may affect their health. The forecasts are routinely made available at least a day in advance, and are posted by 10:30 AM Evansville time on Monday (for Tuesday through Thursday) and Thursday (for Friday through Monday). When atmospheric conditions are uncertain or favor pollution levels above the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, forecasts are made on a daily basis.Ozone forecasts are available from mid-April through September 30th. Fine particulate (PM2.5) forecasts are available year round. Fine Particulate(0-23 CST avg)Air Quality IndexModerateGoodGoodModerateNA*center_img OzoneAir Quality IndexGoodGoodModerateModerateNA* * Not Available and/or Conditions Uncertain.Air Quality Action DaysOzone Alerts are issued by the Evansville EPA when maximum ozone readings averaged over a period of eight hours are forecasted to reach 71 parts per billion (ppb), or unhealthy for sensitive groups on the USEPA Air Quality Index scale.Particulate Alerts are issued by the Evansville EPA when PM2.5 readings averaged over the period of midnight to midnight are forecasted to reach 35 micrograms per meter cubed (µg/m3).Current conditions of OZONE and FINE PARTICULATE MATTER are available in near real-time on the Indiana Department of Environment Management’s website.National and regional maps of current conditions are available through USEPA AIRNow.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Research explores tailgate culture

first_imgFans of tailgating will be excited to learn grilling burgers and socializing in crowded parking lots can accomplish far more than just building anticipation for a sporting event. Recent research by Notre Dame marketing professor John Sherry has revealed tailgating to be a powerful tool for building community and family connections. Sherry said tailgating is a surprisingly intimate experience, with participants sharing in the private lives of neighbors and strangers alike. “Tailgating takes people’s domestic lives and kind of turns them inside out,” Sherry said. “If you go out and look in the fields and parking lots where it occurs, you see people’s private lives exposed to the world: their living room, their kitchen their dining room. People walking around can observe these interior lives and bond.” Sherry said individual tailgates may not appear to be interconnected, but in fact are often part of cohesive and long-lasting social communities. “It’s not just a bunch of private parties going on; there are communities stretching back over a hundred years, over multiple generations,” Sherry said. “There are neighborhoods of people that have been tailgating with one another practically forever.” Sherry said tailgating offers participants the opportunity to interact with friends and family but also leads to frequent bonding among strangers, with some choosing to “adopt” neighbors and new acquaintances into their parties. He said this willingness among Notre Dame fans to incorporate strangers into the University family is what makes Notre Dame tailgating unique. “What strikes me about Notre Dame tailgating is the sheer number of times people talk about the activity in family terms,” Sherry said. “Fans take in rivals from other teams, invite them to tailgate and introduce them to other Notre Dame fans. They try to share the Notre Dame experience with everyone who comes through.” Sherry said tailgating also defies the conventional marketing perception of a brand as a passive concept; consumers play an important role in continuously shaping and defining a brand’s image. Tailgating at Notre Dame displays the reality of this formative interaction between consumers and a brand, Sherry said. “Tailgaters are creating Notre Dame essentially; they’re rounding out the brand that the University stands for,” Sherry said. “Not just the tradition in itself that the University represents, but these hundreds of other individual traditions people are crafting that become intimately connected with what Notre Dame means.” Sherry said he is impressed with how Notre Dame shapes the football gameday experience, creating a safe and positive atmosphere without excessive regulation. However, he also said some fans are concerned with the increasing infringement of new building construction on traditional tailgating spaces. “The bigger the University gets, the more spaces for tailgating get cannibalized,” Sherry said. “From a tailgater’s perspective, that has been the greatest concern, the gradual loss of space to actually do it.” Having studied Notre Dame tailgating extensively, Sherry said he is now interested in branching out to see if his findings apply well to other schools around the country. Sherry said the lack of appreciation for the complexities of tailgating is a great example of why we should all stop and pay closer attention to the world around us. “So much of what we do in everyday life is just participation. It’s like fish in a fish bowl; you’re not paying attention to the context of events because you’re busy living them,” he said. “When you slow down and focus on what’s actually going on with tailgating, see all the amazing behaviors and cuisines being developed, it’s truly incredible.”last_img read more

Colombian National Army Dismantles FARC Cocaine Laboratory

first_imgBy Dialogo March 09, 2015 In Bolivia, 23,000 hectares were used to grow coca in 2013, the country’s lowest mark since 2002, according to the INCB. In Bolivia, 23,000 hectares were used to grow coca in 2013, the country’s lowest mark since 2002, according to the INCB. In 2013, Peruvian security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012. In 2014, security forces in Peru destroyed a national yearly record of 30,349 hectares of coca crops, topping their goal of 30,000 hectares. The dismantling of the laboratory marked the second time in about a week that Troops dealt a strong blow to the FARC’s 48th Front. Cocaine production decreased in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 The number of hectares used to grow coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine, fell in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 compared to the previous year, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) said in its annual report. Coca can be cultivated in limited amounts for legal purposes, but the vast majority of coca cultivation is intended for illegal cocaine production. The Army used intelligence to locate and dismantle the facility, which was in the municipality of Puerto Asís. Soldiers learned of the laboratory from former members of the guerrilla group who had recently demobilized. The Board, which is an autonomous body of the United Nations, attributed much of the drop in Peru to the country’s Integral and Sustainable Alternative Development Program that helps farmers transition from cultivating coca to other crops. The program affects 800,000 residents in seven provinces. The number of hectares used to grow coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine, fell in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 compared to the previous year, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) said in its annual report. Coca can be cultivated in limited amounts for legal purposes, but the vast majority of coca cultivation is intended for illegal cocaine production. Bolivia and Peru grow limited amounts of legal coca, as it’s traditionally used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. The Board, which is an autonomous body of the United Nations, attributed much of the drop in Peru to the country’s Integral and Sustainable Alternative Development Program that helps farmers transition from cultivating coca to other crops. The program affects 800,000 residents in seven provinces. “In recent years the global supply of cocaine from South America has been reduced to an extent that can have a tangible effect on main consumer markets [worldwide],” the INCB wrote in its report, adding the availability of cocaine in Western Europe and the U.S. “remains considerably inferior to when it was at its highest around 2006.” In another operation, the Army’s Mobile Brigade No. 6 of the Specific Command of Caguán eradicated more than five hectares of illegal coca crops allegedly belonging to the FARC in the southeastern Department of Caquetá, the Army reported on its website on March 3. The dismantling of the laboratory marked the second time in about a week that Troops dealt a strong blow to the FARC’s 48th Front. In another operation, the Army’s Mobile Brigade No. 6 of the Specific Command of Caguán eradicated more than five hectares of illegal coca crops allegedly belonging to the FARC in the southeastern Department of Caquetá, the Army reported on its website on March 3. In 2013, Peruvian security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012. In 2014, security forces in Peru destroyed a national yearly record of 30,349 hectares of coca crops, topping their goal of 30,000 hectares. In the municipality of Cartagena del Chairá, Soldiers destroyed 7,700 plants that could have produced $15 million pesos (approximately $5,809) in cocaine for the FARC’s Luis Emiro Mosquera Southern Bloc of the 14th Front. The Colombian National Army’s “General Luis Ernesto Ordoñez Castillo” Artillery Battalion No. 27 dismantled a large cocaine-producing laboratory that allegedly belonged to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Putumayo, the Army reported on its website on March 4. Cocaine production decreased in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 In a separate operation, on February 26 in Putumayo, Soldiers with the Sixth Division partnered with the Navy, Air Force and National Police to seize 430 kilograms of cocaine hydrochloride belonging to the 48th Front. The FARC intended to provide the cocaine hydrochloride, which had a street value of about $12 million, to drug cartels and narco-trafficking organizations in Mexico and Ecuador. The Colombian National Army’s “General Luis Ernesto Ordoñez Castillo” Artillery Battalion No. 27 dismantled a large cocaine-producing laboratory that allegedly belonged to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Putumayo, the Army reported on its website on March 4. The laboratory featured five wooden structures, a plastic roof and a kitchen, and was capable of producing 1,200 kilograms of cocaine worth $33 million pesos (approximately $12,780) monthly. It was operated by the FARC’s 48th Front, but had been abandoned when the Army arrived. In a separate operation, on February 26 in Putumayo, Soldiers with the Sixth Division partnered with the Navy, Air Force and National Police to seize 430 kilograms of cocaine hydrochloride belonging to the 48th Front. The FARC intended to provide the cocaine hydrochloride, which had a street value of about $12 million, to drug cartels and narco-trafficking organizations in Mexico and Ecuador. The Army used intelligence to locate and dismantle the facility, which was in the municipality of Puerto Asís. Soldiers learned of the laboratory from former members of the guerrilla group who had recently demobilized. In the municipality of Cartagena del Chairá, Soldiers destroyed 7,700 plants that could have produced $15 million pesos (approximately $5,809) in cocaine for the FARC’s Luis Emiro Mosquera Southern Bloc of the 14th Front. The laboratory featured five wooden structures, a plastic roof and a kitchen, and was capable of producing 1,200 kilograms of cocaine worth $33 million pesos (approximately $12,780) monthly. It was operated by the FARC’s 48th Front, but had been abandoned when the Army arrived. In Peru, 49,800 hectares were used to cultivate coca crops in 2013, a major decrease compared to the 60,400 recorded by the INCB a year earlier. Bolivia and Peru grow limited amounts of legal coca, as it’s traditionally used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. “In recent years the global supply of cocaine from South America has been reduced to an extent that can have a tangible effect on main consumer markets [worldwide],” the INCB wrote in its report, adding the availability of cocaine in Western Europe and the U.S. “remains considerably inferior to when it was at its highest around 2006.” In Peru, 49,800 hectares were used to cultivate coca crops in 2013, a major decrease compared to the 60,400 recorded by the INCB a year earlier. last_img read more

Banking brands view surging wearables and wonder: Time to jump in?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr For early morning surfers at Sydney’s Bondi Beach who get a little hungry, there’s no need to dig through their duds looking for a wallet or a phone. If they’re customers of Westpac Bank they can just stroll up to the nearest vendor in their wetsuit, buy some grub and pay by tapping a wristband on the POS terminal.The wristband is one of several items in the Australian bank’s PayWear product linethat include near-field-communication (NFC) chips that link to whichever account at the bank the customer chooses. The wearable products include several fashion accessories from designer Hayden Cox, one of which is a waterproof, battery-free patch that can be attached to a hat or sleeve. As described on the bank’s website, “The Centsitive Patch is a discreet ‘out-of-sight’ wearable option. … Add it to the inner sleeve of your ski or music festival jacket and simply reach to tap and pay with it.”Across the globe in northern Europe, Nordea Bank customers will soon be able to make contactless payments using watch bracelets made by the Nordic design brands Triwa and Ur & Penn. Using a Mastercard platform and technology from Fidesmo, which uses a system of card tokenization, the Finnish-based bank plans is to add “jewelry and other gadgets” to the lineup of wearables consumers can use to make payments, including sports bands and smart watches.“While at the moment it’s fair to describe Fidesmo as a niche offering,” says Juha Risikko, Head of Mobile Commerce at Nordea, “… we believe that payments will be integrated into various types of devices in the future and the combined impact of supporting multiple cases will have a big impact on our customer value proposition.” This is only just the beginning, the Nordea executive concludes. continue reading »last_img read more