HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles

first_img View post tag: News by topic HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles View post tag: Seychelles View post tag: Anchor View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defense Share this article View post tag: Defencecenter_img A port visit to the Seychelles provided a much-needed opportunity for the crew of HMAS Newcastle to re-energise ahead of her next high-tempo counter-terrorism patrol on Operation SLIPPER.Soon after coming alongside Port Victoria, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Guided Missile Frigate (FFG) took on around one tonne of mail and care packages from loved ones in Australia, much to the delight of her crew.“It was like Christmas, parcels and letters were going out to people all through the ship. Some people had recently celebrated birthdays, so they got some nice surprises,” Acting Sub Lieutenant (ASLT) Rachel Jones, the ship’s Assistant Supply Officer, said.“Mail is always a massive morale booster on operations. It’s nice to know the people at home are thinking about us.”Stores, water and fuel were received onboard to ready Newcastle for her next patrol and were delivered by the team from the RAN Liaison Office (RANLO), who travelled to the Seychelles from Bahrain to coordinate the port visit.Newcastle also hosted an historic event: the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on the Conditions of the Transfer of Suspected Pirates, Armed Robbers and Seized Property to the Seychelles.The MOU was signed by Australian High Commissioner to the Seychelles, Her Excellency Ms Sandra Vegting, and Seychelles Minister for Home Affairs and Transport, Mr Joel Morgan.While alongside, the crew also had an opportunity to explore Mahe Island, the tropical main island of the 115 that make up the Seychelles.Some jumped at the chance to dive and snorkel in the aqua blue waters surrounding the atoll, while others recharged their batteries by meandering through local gift shops, and sampling the local cuisine.Half way through the port visit, Newcastle left the wharf and went to anchor nearby. Her crew used local water taxis for one more run ashore before farewelling the tropical paradise and returning their full attention to the mission of countering terrorism, piracy and narcotics in the Indian Ocean.Operation SLIPPER is the Australian Defence Force (ADF) contribution to the international campaign against terrorism, counter smuggling and counter piracy in the Gulf of Aden, and enhancing regional maritime security and engagement.Newcastle’s current deployment is the 55th rotation of an Australian warship to the MEAO since 1990, and her visit to the Seychelles was the fourth by a RAN vessel since 2012.[mappress]Press Release, July 5, 2013; Image: Australian Navy View post tag: Newcastle July 5, 2013 View post tag: drops Back to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Newcastle Drops Anchor in Seychelles Training & Education View post tag: HMASlast_img read more

Colombian National Army Dismantles FARC Cocaine Laboratory

first_imgBy Dialogo March 09, 2015 In Bolivia, 23,000 hectares were used to grow coca in 2013, the country’s lowest mark since 2002, according to the INCB. In Bolivia, 23,000 hectares were used to grow coca in 2013, the country’s lowest mark since 2002, according to the INCB. In 2013, Peruvian security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012. In 2014, security forces in Peru destroyed a national yearly record of 30,349 hectares of coca crops, topping their goal of 30,000 hectares. The dismantling of the laboratory marked the second time in about a week that Troops dealt a strong blow to the FARC’s 48th Front. Cocaine production decreased in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 The number of hectares used to grow coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine, fell in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 compared to the previous year, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) said in its annual report. Coca can be cultivated in limited amounts for legal purposes, but the vast majority of coca cultivation is intended for illegal cocaine production. The Army used intelligence to locate and dismantle the facility, which was in the municipality of Puerto Asís. Soldiers learned of the laboratory from former members of the guerrilla group who had recently demobilized. The Board, which is an autonomous body of the United Nations, attributed much of the drop in Peru to the country’s Integral and Sustainable Alternative Development Program that helps farmers transition from cultivating coca to other crops. The program affects 800,000 residents in seven provinces. The number of hectares used to grow coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine, fell in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 compared to the previous year, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) said in its annual report. Coca can be cultivated in limited amounts for legal purposes, but the vast majority of coca cultivation is intended for illegal cocaine production. Bolivia and Peru grow limited amounts of legal coca, as it’s traditionally used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. The Board, which is an autonomous body of the United Nations, attributed much of the drop in Peru to the country’s Integral and Sustainable Alternative Development Program that helps farmers transition from cultivating coca to other crops. The program affects 800,000 residents in seven provinces. “In recent years the global supply of cocaine from South America has been reduced to an extent that can have a tangible effect on main consumer markets [worldwide],” the INCB wrote in its report, adding the availability of cocaine in Western Europe and the U.S. “remains considerably inferior to when it was at its highest around 2006.” In another operation, the Army’s Mobile Brigade No. 6 of the Specific Command of Caguán eradicated more than five hectares of illegal coca crops allegedly belonging to the FARC in the southeastern Department of Caquetá, the Army reported on its website on March 3. The dismantling of the laboratory marked the second time in about a week that Troops dealt a strong blow to the FARC’s 48th Front. In another operation, the Army’s Mobile Brigade No. 6 of the Specific Command of Caguán eradicated more than five hectares of illegal coca crops allegedly belonging to the FARC in the southeastern Department of Caquetá, the Army reported on its website on March 3. In 2013, Peruvian security forces eradicated a then-record 24,000 hectares of coca after destroying 14,234 hectares in 2012. In 2014, security forces in Peru destroyed a national yearly record of 30,349 hectares of coca crops, topping their goal of 30,000 hectares. In the municipality of Cartagena del Chairá, Soldiers destroyed 7,700 plants that could have produced $15 million pesos (approximately $5,809) in cocaine for the FARC’s Luis Emiro Mosquera Southern Bloc of the 14th Front. The Colombian National Army’s “General Luis Ernesto Ordoñez Castillo” Artillery Battalion No. 27 dismantled a large cocaine-producing laboratory that allegedly belonged to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Putumayo, the Army reported on its website on March 4. Cocaine production decreased in Peru and Bolivia in 2013 In a separate operation, on February 26 in Putumayo, Soldiers with the Sixth Division partnered with the Navy, Air Force and National Police to seize 430 kilograms of cocaine hydrochloride belonging to the 48th Front. The FARC intended to provide the cocaine hydrochloride, which had a street value of about $12 million, to drug cartels and narco-trafficking organizations in Mexico and Ecuador. The Colombian National Army’s “General Luis Ernesto Ordoñez Castillo” Artillery Battalion No. 27 dismantled a large cocaine-producing laboratory that allegedly belonged to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Putumayo, the Army reported on its website on March 4. The laboratory featured five wooden structures, a plastic roof and a kitchen, and was capable of producing 1,200 kilograms of cocaine worth $33 million pesos (approximately $12,780) monthly. It was operated by the FARC’s 48th Front, but had been abandoned when the Army arrived. In a separate operation, on February 26 in Putumayo, Soldiers with the Sixth Division partnered with the Navy, Air Force and National Police to seize 430 kilograms of cocaine hydrochloride belonging to the 48th Front. The FARC intended to provide the cocaine hydrochloride, which had a street value of about $12 million, to drug cartels and narco-trafficking organizations in Mexico and Ecuador. The Army used intelligence to locate and dismantle the facility, which was in the municipality of Puerto Asís. Soldiers learned of the laboratory from former members of the guerrilla group who had recently demobilized. In the municipality of Cartagena del Chairá, Soldiers destroyed 7,700 plants that could have produced $15 million pesos (approximately $5,809) in cocaine for the FARC’s Luis Emiro Mosquera Southern Bloc of the 14th Front. The laboratory featured five wooden structures, a plastic roof and a kitchen, and was capable of producing 1,200 kilograms of cocaine worth $33 million pesos (approximately $12,780) monthly. It was operated by the FARC’s 48th Front, but had been abandoned when the Army arrived. In Peru, 49,800 hectares were used to cultivate coca crops in 2013, a major decrease compared to the 60,400 recorded by the INCB a year earlier. Bolivia and Peru grow limited amounts of legal coca, as it’s traditionally used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. “In recent years the global supply of cocaine from South America has been reduced to an extent that can have a tangible effect on main consumer markets [worldwide],” the INCB wrote in its report, adding the availability of cocaine in Western Europe and the U.S. “remains considerably inferior to when it was at its highest around 2006.” In Peru, 49,800 hectares were used to cultivate coca crops in 2013, a major decrease compared to the 60,400 recorded by the INCB a year earlier. last_img read more