KFO claims unanimous public support for proposed 35m euro biomarine plant

first_img Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson News Google+ Twitter Pinterest Google+ Facebook Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH By News Highland – May 9, 2014 KFO claims unanimous public support for proposed 35m euro biomarine plant The official launch has taken place today of the new biomarine plant in Killybegs which, when completed will create in excess of 50 jobs for the area.Flagged earlier this year, this morning Bio-marine Ingredients Ireland held an Information Meeting this morning to give more details of the €35 million state-of-the-art plant.It will generate up to 50 jobs during the construction phase and create 70 direct and indirect jobs provided it gets planning permission and state aid approval.The facility will be used to extract proteins, oils and calcium from fish for use as food ingredients and has the potential to produce supplements for athletes:The KFO’s Sean O’Donoghue describes what will happen next:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/kfo530PLANT.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.center_img Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleTaoiseach slammed for refusal to meet Castlederg victims groupNext articleFitzgerald on Guerin report: If reform is needed, reform will happen News Highland Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

Moyes names new coaching staff

first_imgNew Manchester United manager David Moyes has confirmed the arrival of three trusted members of his Everton backroom team. As expected, Steve Round will become Moyes’ assistant manager, Chris Woods is installed as goalkeeping coach, with Jimmy Lumsden named coach. “I have worked with Steve, Chris and Jimmy for a number of years and I am delighted they have decided to join me at this great club,” said Moyes. Press Associationcenter_img The trio replace Mike Phelan, Rene Meulensteen and Eric Steele, who have all been released following Sir Alex Ferguson’s decision to retire in May. Round, 42, has worked alongside Moyes since 2008, whilst former England keeper Woods had been at Goodison Park since 1998. Sixty-five-year-old Lumsden, meanwhile, has worked with Moyes since his days at Preston North End. Moyes added: “They bring great qualities in their respective fields and I know that, like me, they feel that this is a challenge to relish. I have great faith that together, we can build upon the success this club has enjoyed over many years.” Moyes arrived at Carrington at 8am for his first official day in charge, although his players are not due to report for duty until later this week. It is a huge day of change at United. In addition to Moyes’ arrival, the Red Devils’ plush training ground is officially known as the AON Training Complex as a result of a sponsorship deal announced last April worth approximately £150million. And David Gill’s exit as chief executive means Richard Arnold now takes over as group managing director, with London-based executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward assuming many of Gill’s responsibilities on the football side. “I believe with David and his new team in place, along with our current backroom staff, we can now start preparing for the new season ahead,” Woodward said. last_img read more

Don’t get in a hurry to apply N to wheat

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Normally we would be concerned about producers applying nitrogen to wheat on frozen ground this time of year. The recent wave of abnormally warm temperatures has removed any frost that was in the ground and suggests that green-up may come sooner than recent years.Even if wheat comes out of winter earlier, the crop still does not require large amounts of nitrogen until stem elongation/jointing (Feekes Growth Stage 6), which is generally the middle or the end of April depending on the location in the state and spring temperatures. Ohio research has shown no yield benefit from applications made prior to this time period. Soil organic matter and/or N applied at planting generally provide sufficient N for early growth until stem elongation.Nitrogen applied prior to rapid utilization has the potential to be lost and unavailable for the crop. Nitrogen source will also affect the potential for loss. Urea-ammonium nitrate (28%) has the greatest potential for loss, ammonium sulfate the least, and urea would be somewhere between the two other sources.Ohio research has shown that yield losses may occur from N applied prior to green-up regardless of the N source. The level of loss depends on the year (losses would be smaller if the ground is not frozen or snow/ice covered). This same research did not observe a yield increase from applications made prior to green-up compared to green-up or Feekes Growth Stage 6 applications. Keep in mind that green-up is a descriptive, relative term and not a definable growth stage. Our definition of green-up is when the new growth of spring has covered the dead tissue from winter giving the field a solid green color — thus, growing plants.There is a legitimate concern that wet weather may prevent application of N at early stem elongation. Ohio research has shown a yield decrease may occur when N application is delayed until Feekes Growth Stage 9 (flag leaf fully emerged). Thus a practical compromise is to topdress N any time fields are suitable for application after initial green-up to early stem elongation. There is still a potential for loss even at green-up applications. To lessen this risk a producer may want to use a N source that has a lower potential for loss such as urea or ammonium sulfate. ESN (polymer-coated urea) would be another option but it needs to be blended with urea or ammonium sulfate to insure enough N will be available for the crop between Feekes GS 6 – 9. The source of N becomes less important as the application date approaches stem elongation. The percentage of urea and/or ammonium sulfate would need to be increased with ESN for application times closer to Feekes GS 6. A producer may want to consider the use of a urease inhibitor with urea if conditions are favorable for volatilization losses: warming temperatures, drying winds and no rain in the forecast for 48 hours.A split application of N may also be used to spread the risk of N loss and to improve N efficiency; however, Ohio State University research has not shown a yield increase from this practice compared to a single application after green-up. In a split system, the first application should be applied no sooner than green-up. A smaller rate should be applied with the first application since little is needed by the crop at that time and the larger rate applied closer to Feekes GS 6.In summary, a producer may get away with applying N prior to green-up on wheat. However university data has not shown a yield advantage for these early applications, but results have shown in certain years a major N loss and yield reduction from applications prior to green-up. Why take the risk, just wait until green-up; the wheat does not need most of the N until April and May anyway.last_img read more

Tim Derickson new ODA assistant director

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) Director David T. Daniels has appointed former State Representative Tim Derickson as the department’s assistant director. Derickson most recently served as executive director of the Ohio Board of Embalmers and Funeral Directors. One of his many accomplishments in the legislature was sponsorship of HB 89 in March 2011 that established Ohio Agriculture Week, an annual week of recognition dedicated to the state’s largest industry.“Tim Derickson will be a perfect addition to our team at ODA,” Daniels said. “His farming background coupled with hisTim Dericksonlegislative and executive experience will help our agency and its dedicated employees serve the people of Ohio by responsibly carrying out ODA’s mission of responsible regulation that allows Ohio’s farmers and food processers to grow and prosper.”Growing up, Derickson worked full-time on his family’s dairy farm in Hanover Township, Butler County, while attending Talawanda High School, Clark State Community College and Miami University. A successful entrepreneur, he managed employer health plans including the Butler County health insurance plan. He and his family later founded Colonial Woods, followed by the development of Indian Ridge Golf Club on the family farm. From 2009 to 2016, Derickson served Butler County’s 53rd District as state representative.“Farming and agriculture is my heritage and remains my passion,” Derickson said. “I have great respect for agriculture and food processing and the thousands of people who make a significant impact to the state. This industry employs one in seven Ohioans and frankly, it affects everyone. I look forward to being part of a team that promotes the industry, protects consumers, promotes environmental stewardship and monitors plant and animal health, among many important duties.”As assistant director, Derickson will oversee ODA’s daily operations, including management of more than 450 employees and more than 15 divisions and offices.last_img read more