Unilever shares: Is the stock a bargain?

first_img Enter Your Email Address Unilever shares: Is the stock a bargain? Management at Unilever (LSE: ULVR) is simplifying the company’s legal structure to make mergers and acquisitions easier. As a result, the firm will no longer be a part of a leading European stock index, the Euro Stoxx 50 benchmark. Although leaving the index could cause some selling, Unilever shares are nevertheless up year-to-date. Given the stock’s performance in 2020, is ULVR still a bargain? Here’s what I think. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Earnings estimatesBased on earnings estimates, I don’t think Unilever shares are a huge bargain at current prices. The world economy is expected to rebound rather strongly next year. However, things might not improve that much for Unilever in 2021. For full-year 2021, for instance, analysts expect the company’s underlying earnings per share to increase just 3.4% to €2.59. Given the company’s current stock price, ULVR trades for around 20 times 2021 earnings, which is about the same as fellow leading consumer staple company, Reckitt Benckiser.Unilever shares: ‘defensive’ qualitiesAlthough other stocks probably have more upside, I nevertheless think Unilever shares are still a good deal given the company’s qualities. To me, Unilever’s key quality is being a defensive stock that won’t fall as much in a recession as many other stocks. I view ULVR as a defensive stock because the company has a collection of leading brands. According to a presentation in June, the company has 14 of the world’s top 50 global consumer brands, including Dove and Lipton. Given its leading brands, the consumer staple has substantial customer loyalty. This keeps its products moving in good times and bad. Because Unilever’s products also don’t cost that much, demand for the company’s products is pretty steady in tough times in my view. The brand loyalty and relative inelasticity makes Unilever’s potential earnings more durable to me.I also view ULVR as a defensive stock because the company has a strong balance sheet. That has allowed it to navigate the recent macroeconomic winds with ease so far. The company has a low gearing ratio, an A1/A+ credit rating, and around €11bn in cash and undrawn facilities. With its strong balance sheet, I believe management has plenty of financial resources for M&A, which could help the company grow earnings in the future. In terms of performance as a defensive, I reckon ULVR has lived up to its role this year. Year-to-date, Unilever shares are actually up while the FTSE 100 is down around 16%. I think the company has an attractive dividendAnother key quality that I like about Unilever shares is the company’s dividend. Over the past five years, for example, Unilever’s dividend has been dependable as the quarterly dividend per share has increased from €0.302 in Q3 2015 to €0.4104 in Q3 2020. Given its fundamentals and market position, I believe ULVR will likely pay a dependable and growing dividend in the future as well. In particular, I think Unilever’s earnings per share could really benefit as incomes in emerging markets grow in the long term. Unilever currently gets around 60% of its sales from emerging markets. If the company’s earnings per share grow, I reckon its dividend could grow too. As far as its qualities go, I’d buy and hold ULVR for the long term. Jay Yao has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. See all posts by Jay Yao Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic…And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains.But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times.Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down…You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm.That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away.center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Jay Yao | Monday, 30th November, 2020 | More on: ULVR Image source: Getty Images Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50last_img read more

Free condoms were given to TCU students Wednesday night

first_imgFacebook Linkedin + posts The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years William Konighttps://www.tcu360.com/author/william-konig/ William Konighttps://www.tcu360.com/author/william-konig/ Review: ‘Black Panther’ delivered even with high expectations Three student volunteers helping with Sexual awareness event. TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history William Konighttps://www.tcu360.com/author/william-konig/ Facebook Linkedin TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summercenter_img ReddIt William Konighttps://www.tcu360.com/author/william-konig/ Twitter Review: ‘Love, Simon’ is actually a cute romantic comedy Review: ‘Ready Player One’ is a ton of fun printInstead of flowers or candy, the Alcohol and Drug Education Center gave students condoms for Valentines day.TCU students were given free condoms and information as they walked by the Sexual Responsibility Awareness event in the Brown-Lupton University Union Wednesday night, where they could spin a wheel to learn a sex statistic.The goal of the event was for students to be safe and have an understanding of the consequences of having sex, said Briyet Sigala, a senior psychology major and peer educator for Frogs Care.Sigala said they are not advocating for students to have sex, but if students choose to, they have the resources they need to be safe.When asked why he went to the table, Carlos Hunnicutt, a sophomore marketing major, said the jar of condoms was intriguing.Sigala said she hopes more education will minimize students’ risk of contracting STDs.“Be smart–every choice you make has consequences,” Sigala said.The Alcohol and Drug Education Center hosts multiple events on campus throughout the year, including condom bingo and sex jeopardy.If students believe that they have contracted an STD, they can contact the health center here. William Konig Review: predictions on who will win the Oscar vs. who should Previous articleFort Worth to present development plan for Berry/University area near TCUNext articleRising participation in Cowtown ultramarathon leads more runners to challenge themselves William Konig RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter ReddItlast_img read more

For IT Summit, a focus on innovation

first_imgOpening the University’s seventh annual Harvard IT Summit at Sanders Theatre, Harvard’s chief information officer, Anne Margulies, put forth the goals of the event: “We’re here to build our IT community, to connect more closely to the University mission, and to learn from each other.”Thursday’s gathering, sponsored by Harvard’s CIO Council, brought together IT professionals, key partners, and faculty for a day of programming and concurrent sessions to explore technology innovations and best practices in higher education. This year, 1,400 attended.Karim R. Lakhani, professor of business administration at Harvard Business School and the afternoon keynote speaker, said in his remarks that it’s a brave new world for business, and IT professionals will be the ones to navigate to the increasingly broad horizon.“The whole economy is becoming digital in many ways,” said Lakhani, who, as the faculty co-founder of the Harvard Business School Digital Initiative, specializes in technology management and innovation. Lakhani opened by referencing the confusion and fear this sea change has wrought.“The executives we see have a lot of anxiety. Is Amazon going to take over? Is Google going to become the next Telco?” he asked. “We’re educating the executives at the Business School in how to cope with this change.”The change, he explained to the audience of Harvard’s IT professionals, is scary because it is structural. Rather than focusing on products and services, he said, the current digital economy is based on platforms and ecosystems. In other words, business now depends much less on what you make than on how many people you can invite to join you.Because this model is so different, Lakhani said, “most technological predictions are wrong.” He went on to describe the inaccurate forecast of cellphone usage created for AT&T in 1982. A straight-line prediction estimated a mere 900,000 users by 2000. (In reality, there were half a billion global users by then.) “This curtailed significant investment,” he noted.The result has been “major missed opportunities,” he said. For example, even an apparent market winner, Nokia, failed to see basic changes in the economy. Although Nokia’s phones were first with many technological advances, Lakhani pointed out, the company missed the growing importance of the platform.Ryan Frazier of HBS listens intently to Lakhani’s afternoon keynote address.Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer“The architecture of the industry shifted to a two-part system,” he said. “What mattered was the core operating system and enabling lots of people to participate in your ecosystem, developing apps.” Touch screens and web connectivity didn’t help as developers flocked to more open platforms — and took consumers and market share with them.Google’s recent purchase of Nest home systems for a staggering $3 billion shows an increasing understanding of the importance of platforms. It is not that Google needs to be in the thermostat business, Lakhani explained, but that the interconnectivity of the Nest system offers the possibility of more horizontal business expansion. With customers who value connectivity and the data these systems provide, Google can expand. While the analog thermostat industry might be limited, the digital one is not. Perhaps, Lakhani noted, Nest will begin analyzing clients’ maintenance needs and take charge of scheduling them, or it will advise energy companies.“How are you creating value? How are you hatching value?” Lakhani asked. “Once we can aggregate data, we can rethink how to create value for our customers.”These lessons reach far beyond the business world. Lakhani recounted how, in his role as principal investigator at the Crowd Innovation Laboratory and NASA Tournament Laboratory, Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science, he helped utilize this horizontal thinking. The International Space Station, he explained, has an ongoing problem with part of its solar-energy system. The longerons — long, thin tubes that attach the solar panels to the station — are vulnerable to the extreme difference between sun and shade and so must be manipulated carefully to avoid damage. While NASA engineers had an imperfect solution, the NASA Tournament Laboratory created the ISS Longeron Challenge to help the ISS access more power. Offering a $30,000 prize — “decimal dust” in the NASA budget, as Lakhani put it — the contest garnered 2,000 code submissions from more than 450 entrants, including coders from Italy, China, and Belarus, who never would have been part of the original team.More than half of the entries, said Lakhani, bettered the internal NASA solution. Many implemented completely different methods. Some, for example, would extend the lifespans of the joints that move the solar panels. With additional examples, from a study of MOOCs to a Dutch group that is analyzing — and potentially recreating — the works of Rembrandt, Lakhani made his point.For Harvard and higher education more broadly, the digital transformation is “completely changing the skills we need in our faculty and our students, the tools we need, and the partnership with our IT organization — to even do humanities,” he said. “Our mission as educators is up for us to reimagine.”last_img read more

Mike Trout homers twice, including No. 200, in Angels’ comeback victory

first_img Temps in the 80s expected all week for the I.E. Gutierrez vows to remain on Rancho Cucamonga City Council PreviousLos Angeles Angels relief pitcher Blake Parker reacts after striking out Seattle Mariners designated hitter Nelson Cruz during the ninth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 29: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is congratulated by teammate Kole Calhoun #56 at the dugout entrance after Trout hit a solo homerun during the first inning of the MLB game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on September 29, 2017 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs throws against the Seattle Mariners during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsSeattle Mariners designated hitter Nelson Cruz, right, reacts as home plate umpire Ron Kulpa throws out the next ball, after calling Cruz out on strikes during the first inning of the Mariners’ baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Marco Gonzales, right, looks away as Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout, left, rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Marco Gonzales delivers against the Los Angeles Angels during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano, right, catches a pop fly hit by Los Angeles Angels Andrelton Simmons during the first inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)pSeattle Mariners designated hitter Nelson Cruz, right, points to the sky after hitting a solo home run with Los Angeles Angels catcher Juan Graterol watching during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners’ Nelson Cruz, right, hits a solo home run in front of Los Angeles Angels catcher Juan Graterol during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners’ Kyle Seager, right, gets a hug from Nelson Cruz, center, with Robinson Cano, left, watching after Cruz and Seager hit back-to-back home runs during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs, in front left, gets a visit from catcher Juan Graterol, as Seattle Mariners’ Kyle Seager, right, rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Andrelton Simmons, center, slides in safely, as Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino misses the throw from the outfield on a sacrifice fly by Cliff Pennington during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Andrelton Simmons, right, slides in safely, as Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino misses the ball on the throw from the outfield from a sacrifice fly by Cliff Pennington during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino, right, gets congratulations from Kyle Seager after hitting a two-run home run during the sixth inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Seattle Mariners’ Mike Zunino follows through on a two-run home run in front oif Los Angeles Angels catcher Juan Graterol during the sixth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout watches his home run during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. The Angels won 6-5.(AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout (27) gets congratulations from Kole Calhoun, right, and manager Mike Scioscia, center below, after hitting a home run, his second of the night, during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. The Angels won 6-5. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols (5) gets congratulations from Mike Trout after scoring on a single by C.J. Cron during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Luis Valbuena, right, watches his two-run double to right field, in front of Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun, right, starts to slide while scoring a run, as Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino catches the throw during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun, left, slides by to score as Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino catches the ball during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels’ Kole Calhoun, left, leaps as home plate umpire Ron Kulpa, right, makes the safe call, after Seattle Mariners catcher Mike Zunino missed the tag during the eighth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Blake Parker reacts after striking out Seattle Mariners designated hitter Nelson Cruz during the ninth inning of a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif., Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 29: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is congratulated by teammate Kole Calhoun #56 at the dugout entrance after Trout hit a solo homerun during the first inning of the MLB game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on September 29, 2017 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 22ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 29: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is congratulated by teammate Kole Calhoun #56 at the dugout entrance after Trout hit a solo homerun during the first inning of the MLB game against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on September 29, 2017 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ExpandANAHEIM — A pair of Mike Trout homers, including one in a four-run eighth inning, led the Angels’ to a come-from-behind 6-5 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Friday night.Luis Valbuena’s two-run double against Seattle closer Edwin Diaz drove in the tying and go-ahead runs in the eighth. The Angels started the scoring that inning with the second of Trout’s two homers.“That’s a good comeback for the guys,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “A baseball game is a baseball game. No one has given up. We didn’t reach our goal (of making the postseason), but we’re going to continue to play hard.”Related Articles Tyler Skaggs gave three runs in 4⅔ innings, including back-to-back homers by Nelson Cruz and Kyle Seager in the fourth.“He showed flashes of the stuff that makes you excited,” Scioscia said. “He did a better job with his breaking ball, had a good changeup and had good life on his fastball.”Yusmeiro Petit allowed a two-run homer to Mike Zunino in the sixth, putting the Angels behind, 5-2.They still came back to win for the 47th time, including the 10th time when trailing after seven innings. The Angels are now 79-81, with a chance to finish .500 if they win their last two games.“It’s still fun to come to the ballpark and grind with this team,” Skaggs said. “I still think we want to win every game possible. We definitely don’t want to have a losing season. We’re going to try our best.” Trout’s first homer made him just the fifth player ever to have 200 homers and 1,000 hits prior to his age-26 season. He joined Jimmie Foxx, Mel Ott, Mickey Mantle and Alex Rodriguez. Trout also joined Tim Salmon, Garret Anderson and Brian Downing as the only players to hit 200 homers in an Angels uniform.center_img Trout, who has 33 homers this season, has hit four this week. It was his 10th career multi-homer game. Man found dead in Big Bear Lake cabin Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more