What you should know about how to get your full rental bond back

first_imgLiving Here Cush Partners principal Haesley Cush has the ultimate checklist to get your bond money back. Picture: Annette DewI WAS chatting to a one of our tenants this week, like most people he was telling me how well he had looked after the place and that it was way better now than when he moved in. He was in the process of moving out and he wanted to make sure he was going to get his full bond back. So I gave him my advice.When it comes time to leave your rental property there are some things that all tenants should know in order to get their full bond back.The first starts back at the beginning of the lease. Once you signed your lease and take possession of the keys the clock starts ticking. You have three days to review your entry condition report (ECR) and alert your agent to any discrepancies. I always advise tenants to take lots of photos, make notes on the ECR and ensure you return it within the allocated time. This could save you thousands at the end of your lease.Throughout the tenancy, advise your agent of any maintenance issues, even if they don’t bother you. Most tenants are surprised to know that their lease stipulates that they must advise the landlord of any maintenance. This stops a small problem becoming a major job eg. A small water mark in the ceiling becoming the entire roof caving in from built up water damage.Do not leave the keys on the kitchen counter, take it to the landlord or agent.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour agoUse the real estate agent’s recommended cleaner when it’s time to go. A bond clean is quite expensive. So if you are going to engage a cleaner let the agent appoint them. That way if the property manager is unhappy with the standard of cleanliness then they can deal with the cleaner directly with no extra costs to the tenant.You must return the property to the same standard that it was handed to you, barring any fair wear and tear. This barring any fair wear and tear is the source of many arguments but essentially it’s any damage that is caused by simply using the property in the way it was designed to be used, for example wear to carpets from walking on them.Handing back the property incorrectly can cost thousands. You can’t just simply leave when your lease is up. If you have a lease you are bound to pay rent and look after the property for the entire period of the lease. Once that fixed term lease is finished, if no notice is given, then the lease becomes a periodic lease commonly known as a ‘month-to-month’ lease.You must provide written notice to the landlord that you are leaving. In Queensland this is a minimum of two weeks before you intend to leave, accepting that you can’t just give two weeks mid lease, it needs to be no less than two weeks before the end of your lease or once it becomes a periodic.Possession is often decided on as when the keys are returned. Giving notice and leaving, without returning the keys, can mean the rent keeps ticking over. So don’t just drop them on the bench and leave! Take them to the landlord or agent, ask them to photocopy them and everyone should sign an acknowledgment that they have been returned.* Haesley Cush is the principal of property management firm Living Here Cush Partners.last_img read more

UK decision not to amend rules on fiduciary duty ‘extremely disappointing’

first_imgThe UK will not clarify the fiduciary duties of pension trustees by amending the law, a decision that has been criticised as extremely disappointing by parts of the responsible investment community.In February, the government asked whether it should amend investment regulations for private sector funds, following suggestions from the Law Commission. The Commission said there was a case for changes to the regulation under which trustees have to explain in the Statement of Investment Principles whether environmental, social and governance (ESG) concerns were taken into consideration when making investment decisions. Instead, it said new wording should clarify how trustees weigh up ‘financial’ and ‘non-financial’ factors – terminology preferred by the Commission in place of ‘ESG’ – when investing. In its response to the consultation, the Department for Work & Pensions (DWP) said amending the regulations to offer distinctions between the two areas “would not necessarily lead to greater clarity for trustees”.The DWP argued trustees were aware of their responsibility to consider such matters, citing surveys conducted by the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA).The PLSA’s newly appointed stewardship and corporate governance policy lead, Luke Hildyard, cited the same survey when arguing that trustees were aware of their duties.He backed the government’s decision not to amend the regulation, saying it “shares the view that more prescriptive regulation on fiduciary duty isn’t warranted at this time”.However, ShareAction noted that in the same PLSA survey more than one-third of respondents said their trustee boards were unaware of the Law Commission’s report. A review of equity markets led by John Kay, who recommended the launch of the Investor Forum, triggered the report, published in 2014.ShareAction chief executive Catherine Howarth insisted that the government needed “robust” reasons to ignore the commission’s recommendations.“Disagreement from respondents on the detail of changes to regulations falls well short of that standard,” she said.“Why has the government ignored the chance to bring interested stakeholders together to think this through, and instead taken six months to produce an old-school consultation response rejecting change?”The charity in 2014 drafted its own responsible investment bill, seeking to incorporate some of the Kay Review’s proposals into law.UKSIF, the responsible investment association, also voiced its displeasure.Its chief executive Simon Howard said he was “extremely disappointed”.“This represented a key opportunity to help put UK finance on a more sustainable footing, and it has been missed,” he said.UKSIF noted that the DWP’s decision to issue only guidance seemed at odds with the view of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), which said in 2014 it would ensure trustees were “empowered”.Howard argued that trustees trying to do the “right thing” despite the current regulatory background deserved “explicit” regulatory support from government that would see those lagging behind required to protect member interests.“The government says guidance from regulators is enough – that is wrong,” he added.“The world’s governments are gathering in Paris to try to address climate change. If the threat is important enough for that, it’s important enough to change some regulations.”Read more about the upcoming climate conference in Paris and the pipeline for renewable infrastructure in the current issue of IPE,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to UK government’s response on fiduciary duty consultationlast_img read more

Wellington splits with Wichita Collegiate: Girls win, boys lose despite great comeback

first_imgSumner Newscow report — The Wellington girls basketball team improved to 11-7 with a 49-37 win over 14-3 Wichita Collegiate. Wellington boys made an impressive comeback against Collegiate outscoring the Spartans 28-14 in fourth quarter. It wasn’t enough, though, losing 57-54. The box score for the games are as follows: Collegiate 57, Wellington 54 Collegiate — C. McNerney 19, A. Waddell 12, C. Christian 11, K. Reed 5, J. Copher 4, X. Adams 3, C. Root 2, J. Newlin 1 Wellington209128—49 Wellington 49, Collegiate 37 Follow us on Twitter. Wellington — L. Snipes 16, S. French 12, T. Zimmerman 9, T. French 7, M. Adams 5 Collegiate11141814—57 Collegiate — A. Payne 18, K. Wilson 9, A. Root 7, J. Bolden 2, B. Stocker 1 Collegiate1212112—37 Wellington971028—54 Wellington — C. Phelps 11, A. Snipes 10, I. King 9, T. Pettigrew 3, C. Reichenberger 2, Nance 19. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more