Inner city dream home for car lovers has own collector’s workshop

first_img63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.auA CAR lover’s dream home that’s hit the market in Brisbane’s inner city can accommodate 11 vehicles and has its own workshop to tinker in. 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe 1,012sq m property at 63 Fisher Street in East Brisbane is home to a sprawling Queenslander which has three bedrooms, a study and Airbnb-ready guest accommodation with its own entry, ensuite, kitchenette and patio. 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.au“Number 63 is certainly a car lover’s dream. It’s every man’s dream,” he said. “It has a large workshop with hoist and lots of car accommodation so if you’re a car collector or working from home as a car collector, it’s very spacious.” 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.au“But,” Mr Campbell said, “this site already had a lot to offer.”The property, which is open for inspection from noon to 12.45pm Saturday March 18, was in a prime location, walking distance to 21 restaurants, Woolloongabba stadium, supermarkets and all the benefits of inner city living. 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe property also has rear access via Kingfisher Lane.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours agoReal estate agent Alan Campbell of One Agency Metro West, who is marketing the property with colleague Sue Barnes, said the owners had three properties in row on the market at the same time, one of which was already under contract. 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.auAccording to Mr Campbell there was also a development underway close by that was to include cinemas – “again you can walk there” and a dog park was 50 metres down the street.He said “all reasonable offers” would be considered. 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.au 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.au“A designer kitchen to die for with quality fixtures and fittings; a man cave perfect for the car collector with a hoist; or a home based business with mezzanine level for storage; a cute little studio for a teen retreat or an aspiring artist, and a self-contained guest room with a shady private patio perfect to let out on Airbnb. Something for everybody and when you want to gather together you have a choice of the spacious rear deck or two verandas to capture breezes and avoid the sun.” 63 Fisher Street East Brisbane Qld 4169. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe property has a price guide of $1.8 million-plus and sits in an area zoned low-medium residential so it has development potential.last_img read more

Hurlers Homecoming in Thurles today

first_imgTipp FM will keep you in touch with what’s happening in Thurles.The music and entertainment is expected to begin at around three o’ clock, with Eamon O’ Shea and his team due to arrive at 4:30pm.last_img

Manchester United legend Giggs turns 40

first_imgTwenty-five years ago TV cameras didn”™t capture every moment of significant football action but we should be thankful ITV sent a crew to Anfield to film the final of the Granada Schools Cup in 1988.For the record, Salford beat Blackburn 3-2 with a winning goal coming in extra time at the Kop end. It was the second successive year that Blackburn had lost in the final but in the dressing rooms and indeed the boardroom that night nobody really talked about that.Instead they talked about Ryan Wilson, the 14-year-old who had won the game for Salford. He didn”™t score but his leggy, direct running provided the assists for each of his team”™s goals.“Had our scouts known about him, we would definitely have tried to sign him,’ said Liverpool chief scout Ron Yeats, who presented the trophies that night.Young Wilson, of course, was the teenage footballer who was to become known as Ryan Giggs. Wilson was his father”™s name, Giggs his mother”™s maiden name.If you watch footage of that night at Anfield, Giggs is instantly recognisable. The upright gait, the way he seems to glide over heavy turf, the unwillingness to fall over. A brief post-match interview is amusingly characteristic, too. ‘I was supposed to play for United under-15s tonight but I wanted to play here as the pitch is better,’ he says with a glint of mischief in his eye.Giggs was always a bit of a comic, a dressing-room mimic. He still is. He was always a natural, easy footballer, too. Some players look as though they work hard in thrall of their art. Giggs never had to.Today he is 40 years old. Still he plays on and we should all be thankful. The Welshman is a link to the past, not only in the way that he plays but the simple, uncomplicated way that he has always viewed his career.He could have left United on a number of occasions. Italy always attracted him. Fundamentally, though, he never really wanted to.I am not fortunate enough to say that I saw him play regularly at the start. Those who did were never in doubt. ‘His was a God-given talent,’ was the succinct summation of the great United youth coach Eric Harrison.Happily, though, I have watched him closely over the last 13 years, principally with United but also, for a time, with the Wales national team. It sounds simplistic, but he hasn”™t changed much. His football has morphed, of course, as time took away his searing pace, but little else has.There is no point pretending that revelations about his private life didn”™t surprise everybody when they emerged in 2011.Briefly the skies above him darkened. Some suggested that his hair greyed overnight.He snarled at me in the interview area after the Champions League final of that year ”“ upset at my newspaper”™s coverage of the scandal ”“ and I wondered if that signalled the end of a working relationship. At the start of the following season, though, our paths crossed in a corridor at Goodison Park and a smile and nod of the head indicated that perhaps all would be well.That, in many ways, has been the essence of Giggs, as a player and a person. Uncomplicated and remarkably real for a bloke who has spent 25 years in an industry designed for fakery.Several years ago, for example, when Giggs was suffering at the hands of a Stretford End that believed his time was up ”“ proof that it wasn”™t all easy street for Giggs at Old Trafford ”“ one journalist wrote a piece suggesting he deserved better.The very next day, Giggs called him. ‘I just wanted to say thanks,’ he said.Proof, then, that some footballers do hear the murmurings from the terraces and, indeed, that some haven”™t lost their grip on their manners. Giggs will play his share of games this season. United”™s manager David Moyes continues to need his dexterity, his experience and his calm. It will be on the coaching fields that we will grow used to him over the years, though, and he will be valuable, there, too. He has always been an easy communicator.A career that started as a substitute in a game against Everton in March 1991 has not brought Giggs everything he desired.He never played for Wales at a major tournament and the night Mark Hughes”™ team lost at home to Russia in Cardiff in a Euro 2004 play-off second leg will perhaps always stay with him. He missed an open goal that night, too. Further proof that he was always human.Few will ever touch us the same way, though. It has always been hard not to like him. Even the great patriarch Sir Alex Ferguson couldn”™t stay angry with him for long.Having received a mouthful from Giggs during a game at Watford back in 2006, Ferguson delivered a typically unflinching appraisal of his team”™s performance in the dressing rooms at Vicarage Road. As he went to march out of the room, though, his features softened as he turned to Giggs and said with a smile: ‘And you… don”™t ever speak to your grandad like that again!’last_img read more

Qantas still an Aussie favourite

first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: N.J Despite facing constant strikes over pay and job security disputes, Qantas is still the favoured domestic airline when it comes to customer service, receiving up to 87 percent in a satisfaction report.Leading the pack in the Roy Morgan quarterly Domestic Airline Satisfaction survey, the flag carrier topped the list and was followed closely by Virgin Australia, sitting at 81 percent.Roy Morgan Research international director of tourism, travel and leisure Jane Ianniello said Qantas is still the clear favourite down under, although she was keen to see how the carrier would perform in the next three months as industrial action picks up.“The satisfaction rating for Virgin Australia fell amongst both its leisure and business customers after their reservation and check-in system failed in late September 2010, affecting approximately 50,000 customers,” Ms Janiello said.“Although Virgin Australia’s satisfaction has rebounded in the last quarter, it is still lower than it was before the incident.”For the three months to July, Qantas’ subsidiary Jetstar received up to 66 percent ‘very’ or ‘fairly’ satisfied customers while Tiger’s grounding saw the carrier hit an all time low at 37 percent.Ms Janiello added that she was concerned that the Singapore-based carrier could see it customer satisfaction fall further.last_img read more