Where the party leaders are Monday

first_imgNDP Leader Jagmeet SinghLongueuil, Que.10 a.m. — Holiday Inn Montreal-Longueuil, 900 St-Charles St. E. (star candidate announcement, availability)Montreal, Que.5 p.m. — Presbyterian College, 3495 University St. (cinq-a-sept with youth) OTTAWA — The party leaders’ scheduled public appearances on Monday, Sept. 16. All times are local. Will be updated as details are released. Green Leader Elizabeth MayToronto, Ont.10 a.m. — Fairmont Royal York Hotel, 100 Front St. W. (platform release with candidates)Kitchener, Ont.2:30 p.m. — House of Friendship, 51 Charles St. E. (availability)4 p.m. — 157 King. St. W. (rally and canvassing with candidate Mike Morrice)Guelph, Ont.7 p.m. — 34 Gordon St. (rally with candidate Steve Dyck) Conservative Leader Andrew ScheerLake Country, B.C.9 a.m. — Beasley Park, 3450 Woodsdale Road (announcement, availability)Calgary, Alta.5:30 p.m. — 55 Savanna Blvd. NE (campaigns with candidate Jagdeep Sahota, delivers remarks)center_img Liberal Leader Justin TrudeauWaterloo, Ont.9:20 a.m. — Sandowne Public School, 265 Sandowne Ave. (announcement, availability)London, Ont.2 p.m. — Blessed Sacrament Catholic Elementary School, 1063 Oxford St. E. (photo opportunity)Windsor, Ont.6 p.m. — St. Clair College Centre for the Arts, 201 Riverside Dr. W. (rally with candidate Sandra Pupatello) People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime BernierSaint-John, N.B.7 p.m. — Hilton Hotel, 1 Market Sq. (meet and greet with candidate and supporters)The Canadian Presslast_img read more

CV market makes gains in November after October blip

Registrations of commercial vehicles rise 13.9% in November to 33,303 units.6% increase for vans as long-term growth trend continues. Truck market sees 55.8% uplift following Type Approval-related fall in November 2014. The commercial vehicle market returned to strong growth in November following a dip in the previous month, according to figures released today by The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). 33,303 CVs were registered in the month, an increase of 13.9%.Van registrations posted a 9.6% rise in the month, continuing the general trend seen over the past few years with businesses having grown in confidence and online deliveries surging in popularity.Truck registrations saw a huge 55.8% jump, although this was to be expected given the large fall in November 2014 which followed changes to Type Approval legislation.Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said, “The commercial vehicle market continues to demonstrate phenomenal progress, with sustained growth over a number of years as ever-more confident businesses invest in their fleets.“The sharp upturn in truck registrations comes as no surprise, given the heavy fall seen in the same month last year – but the long-term trend of robust growth is encouraging.”Download the November 2015 CV manufacturing press release and tables.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

Changeup Marder remained with Buckeyes trained successors

This season, the Ohio State softball team played without its three-time All-American catcher. Freshman Melissa Rennie and sophomore Cara Longworth had big shoes because the last person who held that spot was Sam Marder, OSU’s 2010 Female Athlete of the Year. Catcher is a unique position in that, no matter the player, leadership is a requirement. She has to guide the pitcher and communicate with the infield. It did not make it any easier that both Longworth and Rennie were new to the team. “She’s intimidating,” said Longworth, who transferred to OSU after playing her freshman season at Jacksonville State. “She’s hard to live up to.” Rennie was concerned with taking a large leadership role so quickly after following Buckeyes softball since she was 8 years old, during which time she followed Marder’s entire career. “It’s weird to think I have to lead Alicia Herron, because that’s someone I have always looked up to,” Rennie said. But Marder is not done wearing Scarlet and Gray. Although she is no longer behind the plate, this year Marder contributed as a coach, bringing success and experience to the team. As a coach, she hopes to provide insight into the gameday experience for the young catchers. “They’re so young, and it’s so hard to come in without any previous experience with this team and lead them out there,” Marder said. Marder said Rennie has refined her mechanical skills, and it has paid off. Rennie started in 42 of the team’s 51 games this season, and was batting .230. Her .333 on-base percentage ranked third on the team. Meanwhile, Longworth has played both catcher and third base, and started in 25 games. “Cara has one of the fastest pop times I have ever seen, way faster than I was,” Marder said. “She’s a fireball back there. She’s totally in the game, has great leadership skills on the field, is in the game the entire time and she’s almost a natural-born leader out there.” Marder admitted one of the weirdest parts of her new role is the dynamic of her relationships with former teammates. “I’m a coach. I’m staff, but I’m not a player anymore, so that was hard to make that transition,” Marder said. “It was a little bit strange almost to not go hang out with them afterwards.” Coach Linda Kalafatis gave Marder the opportunity to return as a coach, the career Marder wants to pursue. “It’s really a great transition for me into coaching because I’m able to focus just with them, and hopefully next year when I become a coach somewhere, I’ll have a little bit of experience doing it,” Marder said. “I have loved every second of it.” Since 2007, Marder has played an integral role in helping the Buckeyes consistently rank in the Top 25. She was named the team’s Most Valuable Player last season. In 2010, she led the Big Ten with an .817 slugging percentage and .569 on-base percentage while batting .359, and she scored 40 runs with 45 RBIs. She earned All-Big Ten and All-Region honors in all four years of her career, and is the record holder at OSU, with 61 home runs, 191 RBIs, 232 walks and 56 intentional walks. “I was glad to work with her coming in,” Longworth said. “That’s why I was excited to be a catcher.” OSU was swept by Penn State and Wisconsin in its last two series of the season. The Buckeyes’ record fell to 14-37 overall, 3-17 in the Big Ten. It was the worst record for the Scarlet and Gray in the past eight years. read more

Number of women being arrested leaps 50 per cent in a year

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily Front Page newsletter and new audio briefings. Arrests of women have risen by as much as 50 per cent in some areas after a police crackdown on petty crime. Police are under pressure to give out fewer cautions after then-justice secretary Chris Grayling announced in 2013 that they should by used more sparingly.Arrests of women rose by 46 per cent in Lancashire, 45 per cent in Dorset and 40 per cent in Hertfordshire between 2014-15 and 2015-16. Charity the Prison Reform Trust, which produced the figures, said that the reduced use of cautions meant women who would previously have been issued with an on-the-spot penalty were now being arrested and taken to court.Women are more likely to commit offences which would previously have attracted a caution, such as shoplifting and low-level anti-social behaviour. The use of “out of court disposals”, which include cautions, has fallen from a peak of almost 700,000 in 2007 to 181,900 in the year to September 2016. In 2014 Mr Grayling said the UK had a “cautions culture” and that offenders were being “allowed to get away with the soft option”.He proposed a new system which will mean all offenders have to take action such as apologising to a victim or paying compensation following even the most minor offences.This has been trialled in three police forces and further reform is due to take place. The charity said that arresting women and sending them to prison is more likely to cause harm to their children and does not tackle the most common underlying causes of women’s offending, such as poverty, abusive relationships and addiction. Arrests of women fell in 60 per cent of areas, in part because of schemes providing treatment for conditions like alcoholism and depression. In Greater Manchester the number of women arrested fell from 6,794 to 5,138, a 24 per cent reduction. The charity said that the force’s “gender informed” system to deal with to women offenders, which involved referring them to women’s centres, had reduced reoffending.Jenny Earle, director of the Prison Reform Trust’s programme to reduce women’s imprisonment, said “Most of women’s offending is rooted in financial hardship, abusive relationships, addiction and poor mental health.”For too long the criminal justice system has been used as a safety net to get women’s lives back on track, when what is needed is treatment and support.”last_img read more

DEFEATED AGAIN MT Melsungen beat THW Kiel

THW Kiel struggling to find a form at the start of the season. The DKB Bundesliga title is in danger after only four matches in which “Zebras” suffered two defeats! After Hannover at home, MT Melsungen took scalp of Alfred Gislason team in Kassel – 29:25 (15:10).Domestic team were pushed forward with amazing saves of their goalkeeper Nebojsa Simic (14 saves).Michael Allendorf netted seven goals for the winners.Niclas Ekberg scored six for Kiel. ← Previous Story Celje PL conquer Tatran’s fortress – Powerful RK Vardar smash Meshkov Brest Next Story → Vipers and Thuringer HC reach Women’s EHF Champions League 2017/18 read more

Lunchtime Fix 6 things you need to know

first_imgWHAT’S THE STORY?1. ROLF Harris has been sentenced to five years and nine months in prison for 12 charges of indecent assault. A court has heard from his victims today about how their lives and childhood innocence were destroyed by the predator. Source: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire2. AN 18-month prison sentence was handed down to David Cameron’s former aide, Andy Coulson, for his participation in phone hacking when he was an editor at the News of the World.3. HILLARY Clinton said she “cares deeply” about Northern Ireland but is not going to comment on “internal Irish politics”. Her comments were made during an interesting interview with Seán O’Rourke on RTÉ One this morning. Clinton with Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness in 2009 Source: AP/Press Association Images4. A HORRIFIC incident in France to report today after a mother was arrested for stabbing her child’s teacher to death in front of her entire class. [Telegraph.co.uk] Source: Google Streetview5. IS the waiting killing you? Don’t worry, we’ll find out at about 3.30pm today who will be the new leader of the Labour party. Joan Burton says she has her “fingers still crossed”.6. YES, we’re still talking about Garth Brooks and his Croke Park gigs. Today, some of the residents indicated their wish for the cancelled concerts to be REINSTATED. Source: Killinkere GAA/PA picsRead the rest of the day’s news>The Briefcase: good news on the economy, a boom-time property market and the most hated family in Irelandlast_img read more

Three Editors Accept Buyout Offers at Johnson

first_imgLate in 2007, three of Johnson’s top executives were fired in an effort to restructure its advertising sales department. One of those executives told FOLIO: then he was “shocked” by his sudden termination. The current buyouts, though, appear to be cordial. “I’m excited,” Norment, who has been with the company since 1977, told the Maynard blog. Three top editors at Johnson Publishing, which owns Ebony and Jet magazines, appear to have accepted buyout offers and will leave the company.A spokesperson for Johnson did not return a request seeking comment.According to a report on the Maynard Institute’s blog, Ebony’s Lynn Norment and Walter Leavy and Jet’s Malcolm West—three of the company’s four managing editors—accepted the buyouts, which were offered to staffers whose combined age and years of service equal 80 or more. Jet’s Mira Low was the lone managing editor not to take the buyout offer, according to the report.Ad pages were down 14.7 percent at Ebony and 22.3 percent at Jet last year, according to Publishers Information bureau figures.last_img read more

Feds will take over Lower And Middle Kuskokwim beginning June 12

first_img“Chinook salmon, Yukon Delta NWR.” Photo: Craig Springer, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Via Flickr Creative Commons.Beginning June 12, management of king salmon on the lower and middle Kuskokwim River will switch from state to federal control. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game will hand over management to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.Listen nowFishermen shouldn’t see much difference, though. When the switch happens the king salmon fishery will close, but these areas are already closed under state management. This same hand-off has happened since the summer following the poor king salmon return of 2013.That’s because, by federal law, the service has to take over the fishery in times of low abundance to ensure that local people get subsistence priority.The portion of the river switching management lies within the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge from Aniak down to the mouth of the Kuskokwim.Depending on how the run is doing, the feds will announce gillnet fishing openings. Refuge Manager Ken Stahlnecker said that they’ve already got one planned on the first day.“Which is looking like it may be a 12-hour opportunity on June 12,” Stahlnecker said. “We’re trying to finalize things, so I wouldn’t say it’s a guarantee at this moment, but that’s definitely what we’re talking about.”Stahlnecker expects to allow more fishing opportunities than last year. The run forecast looks the same as the previous year, so managers are designating the same amount for subsistence harvest: about 40,000 kings. Last year, fishermen hit below that.“We probably harvested about 30,000, so we ended up being more conservative than our management objective was,” Stahlnecker said.The rules will also be the same as last year. Openings under federal law will be restricted to local subsistence users living on the Kuskokwim river drainage, or along the coast in Chefornak, Kongiganak, Kipnuk, or Kwigillingok. The gear restrictions will be familiar, too.“Again, exactly what they were last year,” Stahlnecker said.From the mouth of the Kuskowkwim River, at the boundary of the refuge, up to the mouth of the Johnson River, fishermen are allowed to use six-inch mesh, no more than 45 meshes deep or 50 fathoms in length.Upstream from there, restrictions change. From the Johnson River up to the boundary at Aniak, the nets can be no more than 25 fathoms.The restrictions are meant to conserve the Kuskokwim king salmon run, which is projected to hit below the historic average again this season.The restrictions apply to the Kuskokwim River main stem and to the following salmon-bearing tributaries within the refuge: the Eek, Kwethluk, Kasigluk, Kisaralik, Tuluksak and Aniak.last_img read more

Three IGU candidates top priority speeding efforts to bring natural gas to

first_imgVote Local October 3, 2017Three candidates seeking election to an open seat on the Interior Gas Utility board all agree it’s taken far too long to bring natural gas into the Fairbanks area. All three say if elected they’d push to accelerate the IGU’s efforts to bring gas here and build a system to deliver gas to its customers.Listen nowThe Interior Gas Utility was established five years ago by the Fairbanks North Star Borough to offer area residents a lower-cost alternative to heating oil, and a cleaner-burning fuel than either oil or firewood.IGU board candidate Patrice Lee is a longtime air-quality advocate, and she said her experience with the issue would help her move the IGU to more quickly secure delivery of natural gas to Fairbanks and from there, to the area’s homes and businesses.“The opportunity to get affordable clean energy to Fairbanks is a natural extension of our need to clean up the air,” Lee said.Board candidate Scott Eickholt agrees that’s important, but secondary to the main mission of getting gas here and distributing it.“A lot of folks are focused on getting clean air,” Eickholt said. “But in order to get there, we’ve got to get the job done first.”Jeffrey Rentzel is also seeking election to a three-year term on the board, and he cites affordability as his priority.“We need to get this going so we can get an alternate and affordable fuel to heat our homes and businesses and it will help us clean up our air,” Rentzel said.The 60-year-old Rentzel retired a few years ago after working 28 years for the state Department of Health and Social Services. He now works as a juvenile justice office at the Fairbanks Youth Facility. He said that experience with bureaucracy would help him get the IGU moving more quickly.“To make faster progress is basically what I’m looking at,” Rentzel said. “Going slow, talking things to death is not what I do. I want to get in, get it done and move on.”Eickholt, who’s 45, emphasizes his experience with construction and contracting gained through nine years of work with Local 942 of the Laborers Union, where he now serves as business manager. Before that, he worked for NORCON, a big Anchorage-based oil- and gas-industry contractor.“I’ve got about eight years working directly with management and contracts in this kind of industry,” Eickholt said. “So, it gives me the background to add a lot of value to the board itself.”Lee cites her diligence in researching issues and organizing and mobilizing the community among her top qualifications for the board. The 62-year-old retired schoolteacher points to her work with Clean Air Fairbanks and Friends of Fox Springs as examples. And she said she’ll advocate for consumers and businesses if elected to IGU board Seat D.“Residents must have stable, affordable, clean energy,” Lee said, “and our businesses will be more competitive with affordable clean energy.”Lee said she’d employ her researcher acumen into the IGU’s proposed purchase of Texas-based Pentex Alaska Natural Gas Company. The IGU is considering buying Pentex, the parent company of Fairbanks Natural Gas, mainly for Pentex’s natural-gas liquefaction facility in the Mat-Su to process the fuel and its trucking operation to transport it to Fairbanks. The utility wants FNG for its local natural-gas distribution system.Both Eickholt and Rentzel say they strongly support the Pentex purchase.last_img read more

First batch of Hajis leaves for Madina

first_imgNampally: Telangana State Home Minister Mohammed Mahmood Ali inaugurated the Haj Camp at Haj House in Nampally on Wednesday night. The first contingent of 423 pilgrims departed for Madina (KSA) from RGIA Shamshabad at 7.15 am on Thursday.This year more than 8,000 pilgrims will depart for Haj from Hyderabad embarkation point. Mahmood Ali conveyed his best wishes to pilgrims and requested them to pray for the wellbeing of Telangana State. He appreciated the arrangements made by Telangana State Haj Committee. Also Read – Warrant issued against Renuka Chowdhury in cheating case Advertise With Us On Thursday early morning, the first batch of Haj pilgrims was flagged off at Haj House in Nampally, for RGIA in Shamshabad by TS Haj Committee Chairman, Mohammed Masiullah Khan, Executive officer B Shafiullah, Assistant Executive Officer, Irfan Shareef and TS Haj Committee members Abu Talha Amjad, M A Shafi Corporator (Rahmat Nagar), Md Arifuddin and others were present on this occasion.last_img read more

Comilla youth chopped dead

first_imgA young man was chopped to death and two others injured in an attack allegedly by local Jaitya Party men over playing badminton at Darichar village in Homna upazila in Comilla on Friday night.Police said a group of young men, including Rubel, son of Warish Miah, was playing badminton in the night.At one stage, Munna, an activist of Ghagutia union unit of Jatiya Party, came to the spot and tried to forcibly join the game.However, Rubel protested the matter which led to an altercation.Following this, Munna called in his party leaders and activists to the badminton court.Later, Munna along with his party men, including president of Ghagutia union unit of Jatiya Party Malek Afsari, again engaged in an altercation with Rubel.At one stage, they hacked Rubel with sharp weapons, leaving him dead on the spot.Two other people also sustained injuries in the attack.Victim’s father Warish Miah filed a case on Saturday against 16 people with Homna police station in this connection, said officer-in-charge of the police station Rasul Ahmed Nizami.Police, meanwhile, arrested four people, including Malek Afsari, over the murder.last_img read more

Khaleda verdict certified copy in reasonable time Law minister

first_imgAnisul HuqLaw minister Anisul Huq on Friday denied the allegation that the authorities are deliberately making delay in issuing the certified copy of the verdict that sentenced the country’s main opposition leader Khaleda Zia to jail.“Khaleda Zia’s lawyers are lying. They will get the copy within a timeframe which is reasonable for typing the 632-page verdict. It will not be delayed even by one minute and the government won’t interfere in it,” said the law minister while talking to newsmen in Brahmanbaria.The verdict was handed down on 8 February and there were rumours that Khaleda Zia might be shown arrested in a few other cases.The minister said Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) chairperson Khaleda Zia has been shown arrested in no other cases. “And she won’t be shown arrest in any more cases.”Also a ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) man, the minister visited Brahmanbaria to join programmes there organised by local AL and its front organisations, apart from paying final tributes to the district’s Akhaura upazila AL member Obaidul Haque.last_img read more

Sleep well to avoid eating junk food due to job stress

first_imgStress at your job can lead to overeating and intake of junk food at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern. New research suggests that a good night’s sleep can serve as a protecting factor between job stress and unhealthy eating in the evening.”We found that employees who have a stressful workday tend to bring their negative feelings from the workplace to the dinner table, as manifested in eating more than usual and opting for more junk food instead of healthy food,” said study co-author Chu-Hsiang Chang, Associate Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe research, published online in the Journal of Applied Psychology, involved two studies of 235 workers in China. One study dealt with information technology employees who regularly experienced high workload and felt there was never enough time in the workday. The second study involved call-centre workers who often got stressed from having to deal with rude and demanding customers.In both cases, workday stress was linked to employees’ negative mood while on the job, which in turn was linked to unhealthy eating in the evening, study co-author Yihao Liu, Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois, said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe study proposed two potential explanations, Liu said.”First, eating is sometimes used as an activity to relieve and regulate one’s negative mood, because individuals instinctively avoid aversive feelings and approach desire feelings,” he said. “Second, unhealthy eating can also be a consequence of diminished self-control. When feeling stressed out by work, individuals usually experience inadequacy in exerting effective control over their cognitions and behaviours to be aligned with personal goals and social norms,” Liu added.The finding that sleep protects against unhealthy eating following workday stress shows how the health behaviours are related, Chang pointed out.”A good night’s sleep can make workers replenished and feel vigorous again, which may make them better able to deal with stress at work the next day and less vulnerable to unhealthy eating,” she said.last_img read more

Space Photos of the Week Shooting Stars and Dwarf Galaxies

first_imgMore Great WIRED StoriesThe disastrous science behind disaster preparednessA decade-old attack can break the encryption of most PCsThe intricate insanity of riding a bike at 184 mphPHOTOS: Icelandic landscapes as you’ve never seen themWe gotta get a better battery. But how?Get even more of our inside scoops with our weekly Backchannel newsletter Iron your space suit and polish your helmet, because this week we are are going intergalactic. Let’s begin by visiting a galaxy in a far-off constellation called Phoenix. This cosmic patch might look like a random arrangement of stars, and while the Phoenix Dwarf galaxy is a real galaxy, it’s still a bit … odd.Next we sift through the debris of a comet called 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, which is responsible for the Draconic meteor shower in the October skies. Did you know that meteor showers are actually the Earth intersecting a comet’s tail? When tiny particles of ice and dust burn up in our atmosphere, they create what we know as shooting stars.Now we try on our Parker Solar Probe glasses and take a look at the center of our galaxy, using the wide angle lens on the brand spankin’ new spacecraft. The probe, which is on a six-year journey to the Sun, tested out its instruments last week and ascertained that every instrument was running and ready for its mission. Take a gander at Parker’s first image, which features our home galaxy as well as a photobomb from Jupiter.Finally, we check out an icy crater on Mars. The temperature drops low enough here that in the winter, the CO2 in the Martian atmosphere freezes into craters, making for some really cool (not to mention cold) photos.Want to keep zooming around in space? Take a gander at all our photos here.last_img read more

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first_imgNews | April 21, 2010 CTA Less Costly Than Cardiac Catheterization April 21, 2010 – Performing coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) saved $789 in patients who had positive stress test results but a less than 50 percent chance of having significant coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to invasive cardiac catheterization, reported a study in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.The study, performed at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pa., compared the false-negative rates, false-positive rates, costs, and radiation exposure of direct referral of patients for cardiac catheterization with the values associated with performing coronary CTA before catheterization. According to lead author of the study Ethan J. Halpern, M.D., at a 50 percent prevalence of CAD, they found performing coronary CTA before cardiac catheterization results in an average cost saving of $789 per patient with a false-negative rate of 2.5 percent and average additional radiation exposure of 1-2 mSv. Dr. Halpern said the study showed “when a patient with an expected CAD prevalence less than 85 percent is found to have a positive stress test result, coronary CTA is a less expensive alternative to direct performance of cardiac catheterization.”Reference: Halpern, E., et al. CCTA: Cost-effective, noninvasive alternative to invasive cardiac catheterization for the evaluation of significant CAD. American Journal of Roentgenology. May 2010.For more information: acr-arrs.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Content Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more last_img read more

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first_img Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. The George Washington University Medical Center has been using iCAD computer-aided technology for more than 10 years. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Related Content Image courtesy of Imago Systems Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Imaging Market in U.S. Could Rise In Coming Years The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy. read more The Hologic ImageChecker CAD system pinpoints regions of interest by marking masses with an asterisk and microcalcifications with a triangle. The Hologic ImageChecker CAD system pinpoints regions of interest by marking masses with an asterisk and microcalcifications with a triangle. Mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are tried-and-true methods for spotting and preventing the spread of breast cancer and other abnormalities. Mammography alone detects up to 90 percent of breast cancers in women over 50, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Difficult and missed readings remain a prevalent issue for doctors, however, especially when treating younger women. But recent advances in technology are helping to combat the problem and make breast cancer more manageable, both by helping diagnosis for patients and by increasing productivity and accuracy for doctors.Computer-aided detection (CAD) reviews a patient’s mammogram or MRI after a doctor has made an initial interpretation — although increasingly it is being done before it is physically placed in a doctor’s hands — operating as an additional set of eyes. If the software detects abnormalities on the image of the breast, it flags the region so a radiologist can review and interpret the area in question.“It’s just like a spell-checker that alerts you to a mistake you may have missed in a document. You will know it is misspelled once you see it, but you will overlook mistakes — it’s hardwired into our systems,” says James Ruiz, M.D., department of radiology, Woman’s Hospital, Baton Rouge, La.The Woman’s Hospital has used Hologic CAD systems since 2004. While files were previously fed through a machine, the hospital went digital in 2005. Today, its 45,000 yearly screening and diagnostic studies, as well as its floor-view exams, are automatically run through computer-aided technology.“Mammographic CAD helps us to overcome the inherent difficulty in being perfect,” Ruiz explains, “and provides an aid to help maintain concentration on the task at hand.”The software for its CAD model, the R2 ImageChecker, is designed using algorithms that are calculated to search for microcalcifications and masses — features commonly associated with breast cancer. The software evaluates characteristics like degree of spiculation, lesion shape, contrast to the surrounding tissue, texture of the lesion and edge texture. As these features become more prominent, so do the software’s marks, indicated as either an asterisk or a triangle, depending on the type of detection.Ruiz, like many in the field, says CAD’s weakness is its false positive rate. He says that it is similar to when a colleague brings film and asks you to look at a case to help determine whether a finding is significant. Discernment is necessary when looking at CAD’s results.“Statistically, it’s going to bring me more cases that are unimportant than are important,” he says. “I don’t view that as being necessarily bad — I can ignore those false positives. On the other hand, in certain situations, there will be marks that are true positive that I might not have seen if [the CAD mark] wasn’t there.”The ImageChecker software comes with sensitivity settings to give users screening flexibility. A region will be marked only if it falls above a selected sensitivity range or operating point. Users can choose a setting for both calcifications and mass detections, giving doctors and radiologists nine sensitivity combination options.More Pluses than MinusesDespite the technology’s false positive rate, Ruiz doesn’t see many true drawbacks to using CAD. He finds that problems that arise have more to do with how humans interact with the program.“CADs are good at spotting microcalcifications, for example, so it would be seductive, but wrong, for a doctor to look for fewer because the CAD is doing it for him. But CADs are not qualified to read the mammogram — that’s what doctors are paid for,” he says. “Any problems blamed on CAD should be more appropriately blamed on the misuse of CAD.”Furthermore, Ruiz says any drawbacks in productivity that arose with analog modalities have been virtually eliminated with digitalization of computer-aided detection systems, because embedding the system into the modality means “the process became invisible.”Rachel Brem, M.D., doesn’t see a downside to using computer-aided technology, either. Brem, director of the Breast Imaging and Interventional Center, professor of radiology, vice chair of research and faculty development, The George Washington University (GWU) Medical Center, Washington, D.C., says the technology has become an integral part of the center’s mammography and breast MRI workflow.“Every case has it; not every case needs it,” she said. “But we know it’s better with it.”The GWU Medical Center has been using iCAD computer-aided technology for more than 10 years, most recently, the SecondLook Digital for mammography and SpectraLook for breast MRI. SecondLook Digital is compatible with both direct digital and computed-radiography digital mammography systems from leading imaging vendors, including GE Healthcare, Hologic, Siemens Medical Systems, Fujifilm Medical Systems and Philips. It seeks to enhance workflow by enabling DICOM connectivity for acquisition systems, review workstations and picture archive and communication systems (PACS) alike. Brem performed several studies on the effectiveness of computer-aided detection for mammography and found that the technology helps detect about 20 percent more cancers than would be detected without it.In addition to mammograms, GWU performs five to six breast MRIs every day, all of which include CAD. Brem says MRIs provide information the others don’t because mammography and ultrasound only look at the anatomy, whereas the MRIs examine blood flow and can provide far more sensitivity.“It also takes an hour, requires an injection and so forth,” she said. “You have to weigh the benefit against the inconvenience. For most women, mammography and ultrasound are sufficient.”But she says that for women with the breast cancer gene or others in critical situations or with a risk greater than 20 percent, an MRI is recommended. In fact, Brem says 10 percent of women who get a breast MRI before surgery find another cancer, and nowadays, “it’s unusual to do an MRI without CAD.”SpectraLook, like most breast MRIs armed with computer-aided detection, aims to help doctors evaluate lesions. In particular, Brem says CAD has become an analytic tool to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, interpreting and observing an area’s uptake of contrast with the knowledge that blood goes in and pumps faster in cancer. In her opinion, the SpectraLook stands apart because of its analysis of morphology. She adds that the technology has the “most sophisticated analysis of workflow and integration” for the hospital, including motion correction, subtraction images, multi-planar reconstruction and maximum-intensity projections (MIPs).Brem compared the helpfulness of computer-aided detection to searching for a lost item in a familiar environment. “How often are you late for work, looking for your keys and you find them sitting right on your table?” she asked. “You see them all along, you just don’t perceive them. [CAD] is a safety net that allows us to diagnose better.”She looks forward to the future of CAD technology, citing the possibilities of looking past its binary limits and being able to stratify lesions and consider other factors, such as risk and family history. But although expectant about the technology’s prospects, Brem acknowledges the field has come a long way.“It used to be that many doctors didn’t want to do screenings in the afternoon because they thought they would be too tired to do the readings,” Brem explained. “With CAD, the level of confidence has certainly increased.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享center_img The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. PreviousNext News | Breast Imaging | August 02, 2019 Volpara to Distribute Screenpoint Medical’s Transpara AI Solution Volpara Solutions and ScreenPoint Medical BV signed an agreement under which Volpara will sell ScreenPoint’s Transpara… read more Feature | August 26, 2010 | Holly Worthy CAD Gives a Boost to Breast Imaging Computer-Aided Detection Can Improve Results for Mammography, MRI News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Artificial Intelligence | July 26, 2019 Progenics Pharmaceuticals Collaborating With Veterans Affairs on AI Cancer Imaging Research Program Oncology company Progenics Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced their collaboration with the Veterans Affairs Greater Los… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more last_img read more

Deepminds AlphaFold is successful in predicting the 3D structure of a protein

first_imgGoogle’s DeepMind is turning its attention to using AI for science and healthcare. This statement is strengthened by the fact that last month, Google made major inroads into healthcare tech by absorbing DeepMind Health. In August it’s AI was successful in spotting over 50 sight-threatening eye diseases. Now it has solved another tough science problem. At an international conference in Cancun on Sunday, Deepmind’s latest AI system AlphaFold won the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) competition. The CASP is held every two years, inviting participants to submit models to predict the 3D structure of a protein from the amino acid sequence. The ability to predict a protein’s shape is useful to scientists because it is fundamental to understanding its role within the body. It is also used for diagnosing and treating diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and cystic fibrosis. AlphaFold’s SUMZ score was 127.9 (the previous winner SUMZ score was 80.46), achieving what CASP called “unprecedented progress in the ability of computational methods to predict protein structure.” The second team, named Zhang, scored 107.6. How does Deepmind’s AlphaFold work AlphaFold’s team trained a neural network to predict a separate distribution of distances between every pair of residues in a protein. These probabilities were then combined into a score that estimates how accurate a proposed protein structure is. They also trained a separate neural network that uses all distances in aggregate to estimate how close the proposed structure is to the right answer. The scoring functions were used to search the protein landscape to find structures that matched their predictions. They used two distinct methods to construct predictions of full protein structures. The first method repeatedly replaced pieces of a protein structure with new protein fragments. They trained a generative neural network to invent new fragments to improve the score of the proposed protein structure. The second method optimized scores through gradient descent for building highly accurate structures. This technique was applied to entire protein chains rather than to pieces that must be folded separately before being assembled, reducing the complexity of the prediction process. DeepMind Founder and CEO Demis Hassabis celebrated the victory in a tweet. Google CEO Sunder Pichai was also excited about this development on how AI can be used for scientific discovery. Read Next NeurIPS 2018 paper: DeepMind researchers explore autoregressive discrete autoencoders (ADAs) to model music in raw audio at scale. Google makes major inroads into healthcare tech by absorbing DeepMind Health A new episodic memory-based curiosity model to solve procrastination in RL agents by Google Brain, DeepMind and ETH Zurichlast_img read more

Lawmakers approve Chinese loan for expanding Route 32 to the Caribbean

first_imgRelated posts:Chinese contractor says cost of expanding Route 32 could rise Costa Rica’s Solís administration seeks changes to $485 million China-backed highway contract Costa Rican exporters report Route 32 closure cost them an extra $800,000 Comptroller General’s Office approves contract to expand Route 32 Costa Rican lawmakers overwhelmingly voted on Monday in favor of signing a $395 million loan from the Chinese government to fund the expansion of Costa Rica’sRoute 32, the main highway connecting San José and the Caribbean province of Limón. The vote tally was 45 to 6.The loan represents 85 percent of the project’s $465 million cost. The Costa Rican government will fund the remaining $70 million.The loan, which is part of a contract to expand from two to four lanes the 107-kilometer highway, comes with the condition that the project be developed entirely by China Harbour Engineering Company using only Chinese workers, caveats that raised concerns among lawmakers who opposed the contract.Six legislators voted against the loan, including five from the ruling Citizens’ Action Party: Otton Solís, Epsy Campbell, Franklin Corella, Nidia Jiménez and Javier Cambronero. The other “no” vote came from Broad Front Party’s Ligia Fallas.The deadline for approving the loan in a second and final round of debate is Feb. 28, a date set by the Chinese government to lock in the loan’s current conditions, including a fixed interest rate of 6 percent for 20 years. The final vote likely will occur at Thursday’s legislative session.On Monday morning the Federated Association of Engineers and Architects issued a statement citing concerns regarding alleged miscalculations in the dimensions of the highway. They also outlined security issues and expressed doubts on procedures to expropriate private lands needed for the expansion.Costa Rican President Luis Guillermo Solís said he hoped lawmakers would pass the bill. He said he believed the doubts cited by the engineers and architects association and other opposing sectors were easy to resolve.“If the bill is not approved the country will lose the opportunity to have a first-class highway,” Solís said. “If they don’t pass it, that highway will never be built. We will have to wait another 25, 30 or 40 years, just like what happened with the Costanera highway,” he said, referring to delays in the construction of Route 27 to the Pacific.Last week Solís promised to include in the 2016 national budget approximately $20 million needed to pay for the expropriation of land and the relocation of public utilities along the capital-Caribbean route. At the same time, Presidency Minister Melvin Jiménez announced the administration’s decision to table from the Legislative Assembly’s agenda 16 bills that were scheduled to be heard ahead of the Chinese loan package in order to move along the vote.Earlier on Monday a group of some 30 truck drivers demonstrated in front of the Assembly’s main building in San José demanding the approval of the Chinese loan. Some 80 percent of Costa Rica’s exports leave the country via Caribbean docks. Many business and political leaders see expansion of the highway as key to boosting exports. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Train service in Costa Rica resumes Wednesday following strike

first_img Facebook Comments Trains are expected to run normally around Costa Rica’s greater metropolitan area on Wednesday after a strike staged by train drivers on Tuesday left some 16,000 people struggling to get to work and school.The Costa Rican Railroad Institute (INCOFER)’s brand new president Cristian Vargas said service would resume on Wednesday. Tuesday was Vargas’ first day on the job.The cancellation of the train service between San José and the provinces of Cartago and Heredia caused a saturation of commuters at bus stations in the three provinces. Lines at bus stations extended for several blocks, transport companies reported.The drivers’ strike came after INCOFER and the employees failed to come to an agreement on a new contract. The train drivers worked for an auxiliary company that was contracted by INCOFER, but the contract expired Monday.Catenaria, the new company hired to provide services for INCOFER, had yet to come to an agreement with train drivers for their continued employment. The employees demanded better working conditions, including increased wages, rain gear and a place to rest in between morning and evening shifts.The workers’ attorney, Jorge Regidor, said that after more than 10 hours of negotiations the new employer agreed to review current salaries and make a proposal in the next two weeks.Negotiations also included an agreement to provide employees with new uniforms and to pay travel expenses and accommodation for workers who live outside the train routes.The Public Services Regulatory Authority said Tuesday afternoon that it is considering filing an administrative complaint against INCOFER for suspending a public service that impacted the daily routine of thousands of citizens.Lawmakers agreed to call INCOFER president Vargas to appear before the Legislative Assembly on Thursday to explain why the train operator hired a new private contractor to provide train services.In 2015, trains transported a total of 3.7 million people around Cartago, Heredia and San José, INCOFER reported earlier this year. The company is working on opening a new route between San José and Alajuela. UH: Acuerdo entre maquinistas y contratista logra reanudación del servicio de trenes para mañana miércoles 17 de agosto en horario normal— INCOFERCR (@INCOFERCR) August 16, 2016center_img Related posts:Lawmaker proposes suspending permits of motorists who crash into trains Taxi drivers to stage another demonstration against Uber Taxi drivers to stage nationwide protest against Uber on Tuesday Costa Rica to purchase eight new trains from Chinese companylast_img read more